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Staying informed is also a great way to stay healthy. Keep up-to-date with all the latest health news here.

27 Jan

Is A Bigger Brain Better?

Brain size doesn't always matter when it comes to aging and memory.

24 Jan

Adolescents and excessive alcohol consumption

Teens Who Become Heavy Drinkers May Outgrow The Dangerous Habit.

23 Jan

Undercover FDA Investigation Finds Illegal Steroid Creams Being Sold Over The Counter

Investigators recommend checking labels of steroid products purchased at foreign import stores.

What's the Best Treatment for a Child's Broken Bone?

What's the Best Treatment for a Child's Broken Bone?

Fiberglass and plaster casts are widely used to treat broken bones in kids, but they have drawbacks compared with other methods such as braces and splints, experts say.

Doctors and patients should review the available options, considering not only treatment of the fracture, but also patient comfort and compliance as well as the burden ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 28, 2020
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Girls With Autism Diagnosed Later Than Boys

Girls With Autism Diagnosed Later Than Boys

Girls tend to be diagnosed with autism at an older age than boys, perhaps delaying essential treatment, a new study concludes.

That delay in diagnosis is a clinically important finding, said study author Eric Morrow, an associate professor of molecular biology, neuroscience and psychiatry at Brown University.

"The major treat...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 28, 2020
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Why Vaping Emergencies May Be Missed

Why Vaping Emergencies May Be Missed

Diagnosing lung emergencies caused by vaping can be a challenge because symptoms can look like pneumonia or go unrecognized, according to a new case report.

The vaping illness known as EVALI (electronic cigarette- or vaping-associated lung injury) has so far killed nearly 60 people in the United States. More than 2,600 have been hospi...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • January 28, 2020
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Blood Pressure Dips Upon Standing Might Not Be as Dangerous as Thought

Blood Pressure Dips Upon Standing Might Not Be as Dangerous as Thought

A common condition called "orthostatic hypotension" -- a sudden drop in blood pressure when standing up -- has long been tied to the potential for dangerous falls in older people.

But a new study suggests that doctors who manage blood pressure in older patients shouldn't worry that their treatments are more hazardous for folks with the...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • January 28, 2020
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Psychedelic Drug Eases Cancer Patients' Distress Long Term

Psychedelic Drug Eases Cancer Patients' Distress Long Term

A single dose of the psychedelic ingredient in "magic mushrooms" may bring long-lasting relief to cancer patients who suffer anxiety and depression, a new, small study suggests.

Researchers found that of 15 patients who'd received a one-time treatment with psilocybin, most were still showing "clinically significant" improvements in anx...

Too Few Patients Enrolling in Cancer Trials

Too Few Patients Enrolling in Cancer Trials

Enrollment in clinical trials that can potentially extend the life of cancer patients is too low, a new study finds.

Researchers at Penn State also found that white males with private health insurance and cancers that have spread, and who are treated at academic medical centers, are most likely to enroll in clinical trials.

  • Kayla McKiski
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  • January 28, 2020
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Schizophrenia Meds Safe Long-Term, Study Finds

Schizophrenia Meds Safe Long-Term, Study Finds

Good news for people with schizophrenia: Long-term antipsychotic-drug treatment does not increase the risk of heart disease. And taking the drugs is associated with a lower risk of death, according to a new study.

The average life expectancy of people with schizophrenia is 10 to 20 years less than in the general population. There has l...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 28, 2020
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  • Full Page
AHA News: High School Basketball Player Saved by CPR Helps Win Championship

AHA News: High School Basketball Player Saved by CPR Helps Win Championship

When 17-year-old Ben Blankenhorn received his CPR certification as part of his lifeguard training, the lessons carried added resonance.

Just 10 months earlier, Blankenhorn had been saved by CPR.

The morning of Aug. 22, 2017, he woke up about 5:30 a.m. He drove to San Marcos High School near his home in Santa Barbara, Calif....

Coronavirus Deaths Top 100 in China, While U.S Issues Travel Alert

Coronavirus Deaths Top 100 in China, While U.S Issues Travel Alert

As the death toll in China's coronavirus outbreak surpassed 100 on Tuesday, the United States expanded its travel alert and prepared to evacuate American government workers who are in the center of the epidemic.

Overnight, the number of cases of the 2019-nCoV coronavirus in China shot from 2,835 to 4,515, the New York Times repo...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 28, 2020
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Despite Obamacare, Number in U.S. Who Can't Afford to See Doctor Keeps Rising

Despite Obamacare, Number in U.S. Who Can't Afford to See Doctor Keeps Rising

Even though the Affordable Care Act expanded access to health insurance, the number of Americans who can't afford to see a doctor keeps increasing, a new study shows.

The researchers found that compared with two decades ago, more Americans today say they have skipped a needed trip to the doctor due to costs, despite a roughly 60% i...

Americans Toss Out Nearly a Third of Food at Home

Americans Toss Out Nearly a Third of Food at Home

Before you throw any leftovers away, heed new research that suggests the choice could hit you right in your pocketbook.

It turns out that almost one-third of food in American households goes to waste, costing each household thousands of dollars a year, researchers report.

"Our findings are consistent with previous studies, w...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 28, 2020
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Imaging Technique Tracks Down Stray Lung Cancer Cells for Surgeons

Imaging Technique Tracks Down Stray Lung Cancer Cells for Surgeons

Combining an imaging technology with a new drug that "lights up" lung cancer cells may help surgeons spot hidden bits of cancer, a new study suggests.

The small, preliminary study found that the new combo -- dubbed intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) -- helped improve outcomes in surgeries of 1 out of 4 patients.

The dru...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • January 28, 2020
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A Stroke at 30,000 Feet? For One Lucky Passenger, It Wasn't

A Stroke at 30,000 Feet? For One Lucky Passenger, It Wasn't

A flight attendant on a recent commercial flight sent out the message: "Is there a doctor on board?"

An otherwise young, fit male passenger had suddenly lost the ability to move the muscles on the right side of his face, including the ability to close his right eye. He was drooling and had slurred speech.

Dr. Alan Hunter, who...

  • E.J. Mundell
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  • January 27, 2020
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Could a Common Diuretic Med Help Ease Autism Symptoms?

Could a Common Diuretic Med Help Ease Autism Symptoms?

A prescription drug that's long been used to treat the buildup of fluid in the body might do double duty as a means of easing autism symptoms in young children, new research shows.

If replicated in future trials, the drug treatment might be a breakthrough, since current treatments for autism in preschool kids are mainly behavioral -- t...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 27, 2020
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Losing Sense of Smell Can Worsen Life in Many Ways: Study

Losing Sense of Smell Can Worsen Life in Many Ways: Study

Could you imagine not being able to smell bacon frying, or freshly cut grass, or the presence of smoke?

People who lose their sense of smell face difficulties that can affect their daily lives and put their health and safety at risk, a new British study suggests.

It included 71 patients, ages 31 to 80, who lost their sense of...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 27, 2020
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Gene Test Might Spot Soccer Players at High Risk for Brain Trouble

Gene Test Might Spot Soccer Players at High Risk for Brain Trouble

A gene mutation implicated in the risk for Alzheimer's disease might also impair memory in soccer players who head the ball a lot, a new study suggests.

The finding could have implications for young athletes in contact sports where the head can take hits during play.

Among soccer players who headed the ball the most, those w...

  • Steven Reinberg
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  • January 27, 2020
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  • Full Page
Poverty Could Drive Up Youth Suicide Risk

Poverty Could Drive Up Youth Suicide Risk

New research shows that children and teens in U.S. areas with greater levels of poverty face a higher risk of suicide.

"Our findings suggest that community poverty is a serious risk factor for youth suicide, which should help target prevention efforts," said lead study author Dr. Jennifer Hoffmann. She is a pediatric emergency medicine...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 27, 2020
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At the Barbershop, a Trim -- and a Diabetes Screening

At the Barbershop, a Trim -- and a Diabetes Screening

Hundreds of black men recently discovered they could get more than a trim at their local barbershops. They were offered diabetes testing, too.

A new study offered customers diabetes screenings at eight New York City barbershops. Among those who took the test, 10 percent learned they had average blood sugar levels that indicated type 2...

  • Serena Gordon
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  • January 27, 2020
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Does Size Matter? Volume of Brain Area Not Always Tied to Memory, Thinking

Does Size Matter? Volume of Brain Area Not Always Tied to Memory, Thinking

When it comes to parts of your brain, bigger isn't necessarily better.

Experts long believed that a bigger hippocampus meant better memory. But new research finds that the size of this seahorse-shaped structure deep in the brain doesn't always predict learning and memory abilities.

Researchers looked at more than 330 older ad...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 27, 2020
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Colon Cancer Hits Poor, City Dwellers Hardest: Study

Colon Cancer Hits Poor, City Dwellers Hardest: Study

Young Americans who live in urban areas or live with low income or low education levels are more likely to die if they get colon cancer, a new study finds.

"There are a lot of disparities in health care," said lead investigator Dr. Ashley Matusz-Fisher, an internist at the Levine Cancer Institute in Charlotte, N.C. "It is important to ...

  • Robert Preidt
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  • January 27, 2020
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  • Full Page
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