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04 Aug

More Americans Are Anemic Due to Changes in the American Diet, Study Finds

Iron-deficiency anemia is on the rise as people eat less beef and more chicken, researchers say.

03 Aug

No Sign COVID Raises Risk of Preterm Birth

Researchers in Canada find no increase in preterm births or stillbirths during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic

02 Aug

Kids Exposed to Secondhand Pot Smoke Get More Colds and Flu, Study Finds

Children whose parents regularly smoke or vape pot suffer more viral respiratory infections, researchers say.

WHO Slams COVID-19 Booster Shots in Wealthy Nations

WHO Slams COVID-19 Booster Shots in Wealthy Nations

Wealthy nations shouldn't be giving COVID-19 vaccine booster shots to their citizens while poor nations struggle to get first doses of vaccines, the World Health Organization (WHO) said Wednesday.

The U.N. health organization called for a moratorium on booster shots until at least the end of September, even for the elderly, health care wor...

Time to Rethink Suicide Warnings on Labels for Anti-Seizure Meds?

Time to Rethink Suicide Warnings on Labels for Anti-Seizure Meds?

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Since 2008, anti-seizure drugs have carried a warning that they may increase users' suicide risk. But a new analysis finds no evidence of such a risk with newer medications.

Researchers found that five medications approved since 2008 showed no link to suicide risk among patient...

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2021
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Wuhan Tests All Residents as Delta Variant Rages Where Pandemic Began

Wuhan Tests All Residents as Delta Variant Rages Where Pandemic Began

All 11 million residents of the city of Wuhan will be tested for COVID-19 after three locally transmitted cases were reported in the city on Monday, Chinese officials said Tuesday.

The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 was first detected in Wuhan in 2019.

"To ensure that everyone in the city is safe, city-wide nucleic acid testing wil...

AHA News: She Couldn't Put Up Her Arms on a Roller Coaster. A Stroke Followed.

AHA News: She Couldn't Put Up Her Arms on a Roller Coaster. A Stroke Followed.

Like many roller coaster lovers, Brooke O'Connell and her son Declan always threw their hands up in the air during descents.

"Mom, put your hands up!" he shouted while the two shared a ride on a corkscrew coaster at an amusement park in Orlando.

But Brooke couldn't raise her arms. She figured the centrifugal force kept them down.

...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • August 4, 2021
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Full Approval of Pfizer COVID Vaccine Could Come in September

Full Approval of Pfizer COVID Vaccine Could Come in September

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is speeding up its timetable for full approval of the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, hoping to complete the process by early September.

President Joe Biden said last week that he expected a fully approved vaccine in early fall, but the FDA's unofficial deadline is Labor Day or sooner, according to multipl...

  • Ernie Mundell and Robin Foster HealthDay Reporters
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  • August 4, 2021
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Biden Offers COVID Vaccines to Migrants in Custody Along Mexican Border

Biden Offers COVID Vaccines to Migrants in Custody Along Mexican Border

COVID-19 vaccines will be offered to migrants in U.S. custody at the Mexican border, federal government officials said Tuesday.

The Department of Homeland Security will provide the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine to migrants soon after they cross into the United States, two agency officials with knowledge of the plan told the Was...

  • Robert Preidt and Robin Foster
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  • August 4, 2021
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Regeneron Drug Approved to Help Prevent Severe COVID in Vulnerable After Exposure

Regeneron Drug Approved to Help Prevent Severe COVID in Vulnerable After Exposure

A preventive monoclonal antibody injection for people at high risk for developing severe COVID-19 after exposure to the coronavirus has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

The first dose of Regeneron's cocktail must be injected within 96 hours of exposure to the coronavirus, the FDA said in a statement.

It contain...

How the Delta Variant Is Changing the U.S. Forecast for COVID-19

How the Delta Variant Is Changing the U.S. Forecast for COVID-19

COVID-19 vaccines are helping protect the unvaccinated as the new Delta strain surges across the United States, but experts say its high infectiousness could mean even more people need to take the jab to achieve true herd immunity.

Tracking data shows COVID cases aren't spiking as much in places with high vaccination rates as they are in p...

  • Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2021
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Changing Diets Mean More Americans Are Anemic Now

Changing Diets Mean More Americans Are Anemic Now

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Growing numbers of Americans aren't getting enough iron in their diets most likely due to changes in farming practices and a shift away from red meat, researchers report.

The upshot: Rates of iron-deficiency anemia are on the rise.

"Iron deficiency remains a major pu...

  • Denise Mann HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2021
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Women Can Dance Themselves to Better Health After Menopause

Women Can Dance Themselves to Better Health After Menopause

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Better health and self-image might just be a samba or some funky moves away.

That's true for postmenopausal women who, a new study says, can dance their way to better physical and emotional health.

"In addition to the positive effects on physical, metabolic a...

  • Cara Murez HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 4, 2021
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Is It COVID? Early Signs May Differ by Age, Gender

Is It COVID? Early Signs May Differ by Age, Gender

Exactly what symptoms of early COVID-19 infection you suffer may depend on both your age and gender, a new study finds.

"As part of our study, we have been able to identify that the profile of symptoms due to COVID-19 differs from one group to another. This suggests that the criteria to encourage people to get tested should be personalized...

Smoggy Air Might Help Spur Sinusitis

Smoggy Air Might Help Spur Sinusitis

Air pollution could cause sinus misery, new research suggests.

Specifically, tiny particulate air pollution (known as PM2.5) could contribute to chronic rhinosinusitis, a condition in which the sinuses get infected or irritated, become swollen, are severely congested and secrete mucus into the throat for 12 weeks or more.

"To our kno...

Eating Less Meat Means a Healthier Heart

Eating Less Meat Means a Healthier Heart

For people at any age, eating a healthy, plant-based diet is tied to a lower risk of heart attack and heart disease, two new studies show.

Both studies were published Aug. 4 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, and support the heart association's dietary guidelines.

"A nutritionally r...

Portable Generators Recalled After Handle Amputates Fingers

Portable Generators Recalled After Handle Amputates Fingers

Reports of amputated and crushed fingers have prompted the recall of thousands of portable generators made by Generac.

The recall involves more than 321,000 gas-powered Generac and DR 6500 watt and 8000 watt portable generators in the United States, and more than 4,500 of the generators in Canada.

An unlocked handle can trap users' f...

Try These 3 Tips to Lose Those Pandemic Pounds

Try These 3 Tips to Lose Those Pandemic Pounds

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) – If you're like many people, your waistline has expanded during the pandemic.

"The world shut down," said Heather Tressler, a registered dietitian at the Penn State Celiac Clinic at Penn State Health's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. "Maybe you didn't change what you ate, but you became less a...

NYC Becomes First to Require Vaccination Proof for Indoor Activities

NYC Becomes First to Require Vaccination Proof for Indoor Activities

New York City on Tuesday became the first urban center in the United States to require proof of vaccination if you want to enjoy the pleasures of dining indoors, watching live performances inside or using the gym.

The rule, which also applies to employees in these settings, will take effect later this month, The New York Times re...

  • Robin Foster and Robert Preidt
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  • August 3, 2021
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HRT Could Raise Odds for Asthma

HRT Could Raise Odds for Asthma

TUESDAY, Aug. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of women who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to ease their transition through menopause may be unknowingly upping their risk for asthma.

The concern follows a study that spent more than two decades tracking a potential link between HRT and late-onset asthma among ...

  • Alan Mozes HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 3, 2021
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The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

The Bigger the City, the Lower the Depression Rates?

TUESDAY, Aug. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Americans living in big cities have relatively low rates of depression, despite the hustle and bustle -- or maybe because of it, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that compared with smaller U.S. cities, big urban hubs generally had lower rates of depression

  • Amy Norton HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 3, 2021
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Sleep Apnea Doubles Odds for Sudden Death

Sleep Apnea Doubles Odds for Sudden Death

TUESDAY, Aug. 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- With apologies to William Shakespeare, this is the stuff bad dreams are made of: Sleep apnea may double your risk for sudden death.

The condition — in which a person's airway is repeatedly blocked during sleep, causing pauses in breathing — may also increase the risk for high...

  • Steven Reinberg HealthDay Reporter
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  • August 3, 2021
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AHA News: Bob Odenkirk's 'Small' Heart Attack? Doctors Say They're a Big Deal

AHA News: Bob Odenkirk's 'Small' Heart Attack? Doctors Say They're a Big Deal

When actor Bob Odenkirk collapsed on the set of "Better Call Saul" last week in New Mexico, fans held their breath – and obsessively checked for updates on social media – until word came that he was expected to be OK.

"I had a small heart attack," he tweeted on Friday, thanking the doctors who "knew how to fix the blockage without surg...

  • American Heart Association News
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  • August 3, 2021
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