Now accepting Scholarship Applications. All applications must be post marked by April 5, 2019.
Odenville Drugs Logo

Get Healthy!

Results for search "ALS (Lou Gehrig's Disease)".

Health News Results - 11

TUESDAY, Aug. 13, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Scheduled for surgery? Don't forget to take your dentures out.

According to a new report, one 72-year-old man who had abdominal surgery in England swallowed his dentures during the procedure.

They got stuck in his throat -- and were only discovered eight days later.

The initial surgery was to remove a harmless lump in the...

MONDAY, Aug. 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women should keep in mind that donating their umbilical cord blood could save lives, a clinical cell therapy expert says.

Cord blood is the blood collected from the umbilical cord and placenta after the birth of a healthy baby, said Fabio Triolo. He is director of the Cellular Therapy Core laboratories at University of Texas Health Sci...

WEDNESDAY, June 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's not often that anything good is associated with obesity. Yet heavy folks and those who bulk up as they age may have less risk for the deadly disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study finds.

The Norwegian study found that over several decades, people who packed on the most weight had a 37% lower risk of ALS compared t...

WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Reading the brain waves that control a person's vocal tract might be the best way to help return a voice to people who've lost their ability to speak, a new study suggests.

A brain-machine interface creates natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a "virtual" vocal tract -- an anatomically detailed computer simu...

FRIDAY, April 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Black Americans with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) tend to live longer than whites with the disease because blacks are more likely to have a procedure called a tracheostomy, a new study shows.

But that may not always be a good thing, the researchers noted.

ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive neurodegenerativ...

THURSDAY, Feb. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Professional soccer players may be vulnerable to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study suggests.

The Italian researchers also found that soccer players may develop the neurodegenerative disease at a much younger age than people in the general population.

ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, affects nerve cells that c...

THURSDAY, Sept. 13, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The minds of patients suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are damaged by the disease, despite the longstanding belief that this was not the case, a new study reveals.

In fact, in the later stages of ALS, also called Lou Gehrig's disease, patients experience a decline in their thinking and language skills, researchers report...

MONDAY, April 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Fitness buffs who push themselves to the limit during workouts might slightly increase their risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study suggests.

The same may hold true for working stiffs whose jobs place extreme physical demands upon them, the European researchers said.

But the study did not prove that extr...

TUESDAY, Feb. 27, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Truckers and others who are routinely exposed to diesel fumes while on the job might face a greater chance of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a new study suggests.

The increased risk hit a high of 40 percent when compared against men with no such exposure, said study author Aisha Dickerson. She's a postdoctoral research fello...

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots playing in Sunday's Super Bowl may have already taken a hidden hit before setting foot on the field, a new study suggests.

The new research says career NFL players have a slightly higher risk of early death than a group of replacement players who stood in for a few games during a short league s...

FRIDAY, Nov. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- For a child with spastic cerebral palsy, simply grasping a toy may be impossible. But infusions of their own umbilical cord blood might make basic movements like this easier, researchers say.

Children with spastic cerebral palsy have stiff muscles that can make it hard to move. The condition is usually caused by brain damage before or at birth....