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Health News Results - 178

As kids get ready for summer camp, parents might be fretting about exposure to COVID-19, but a doctors' group says they also need to make sure their campers will be protected from allergy and asthma triggers.

"The [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention] has issued guidelines for keeping campers and staff protected from COVID-19. At the same time, camps still need to make sure measur...

Peloton said Wednesday it is recalling its Tread and Tread+ exercise machines, just weeks after the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warned that one child's death and dozens of injuries have been linked to the treadmills.

In a company statement, Peloton CEO John Foley acknowledged the company had been wrong to initially fight the CPSC's April 17 request to recall the product...

As children begin to return to their favorite sports, parents need to ensure that their youngsters use protective eyewear, a leading group of eye specialists says.

Nearly 30,000 people suffer sports-related eye injuries every year in the United States, but 90% of emergency room visits for such injuries could be prevented by protective eyewear, according to the American Academy of Ophthalm...

Bullied and mistreated teens are much more likely to fantasize about hurting or killing others, a new study warns.

"One way to think about fantasies is as our brain rehearsing future scenarios," said lead author Manuel Eisner, director of the University of Cambridge Violence Research Center in the U.K.

His research included more than 1,400 young people in Zurich, Switzerland, who we...

THURSDAY, April 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- There appears to be a silver lining to forced school and business closures during early weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study: Fewer kids used e-cigarettes.

Compared to the previous quarter, vaping rates fell among 15- to 20-year-olds while widespread stay-at-home orders were in place from March 14 to June ...

Users with small children and pets should stop using Peloton Tread+ exercise machines immediately, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

The warning comes after one child died and dozens of others have been sucked underneath the home treadmill. One family pet also was injured, CPSC said.

Less than a month ago, Peloton reported a child's death by a Peloton ...

In news that should reassure many pregnant women, having an epidural during childbirth won't increase the child's risk of autism, researchers report.

The new findings refute a widely criticized 2020 study that said epidurals were associated with a 37% higher risk of autism.

Experts said that study didn't account for numerous socioeconomic, genetic and medical risk factors for auti...

A new study offers more reassurance that mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 can safely breastfeed their babies.

The study of 55 infants born to moms with COVID-19 found that none contracted the virus -- even though most started getting breast milk in the hospital.

Researchers said the findings support existing advice from public health authorities. Last year, the World Health Organiza...

Though playing youth sports comes with new pandemic-era precautions and some experts are linking these activities to community spread of COVID-19, many kids are still participating, according to a parent survey.

In the survey, about three-quarters of parents said their child's teams mostly did the right thing while resuming sports during COVID. Thirteen percent said officials were too str...

Kids will be kids, and that's exactly why Holly McDade plans to get her three young children the COVID-19 vaccine as soon as it becomes available to them.

"Little kids can't help but touch their mouths and their noses and touch other things," said McDade, 32, of Strasburg, Va. "They just don't think about it. It's not where their brains are at yet."

McDade isn't concerned so much ab...

Splashing in a pool. Hiking through fresh green forests. Making macaroni art. Stitching together a leather wallet. Knocking a kickball around.

It's nearly time for summer camp, and the experience is expected to be especially important for America's children because of the pandemic.

"We really feel like summer camps are a huge opportunity for kids to disconnect from screens that they...

More than one-quarter of U.S. parents don't plan to vaccinate their kids for COVID-19, and roughly as many oppose school-required coronavirus shots, a new study finds.

This opposition was more common among moms than dads, and was especially common among white mothers who identified as Republican/Republican-leaning, the researchers said.

"Women tend to serve as family health managers...

Many U.S. parents don't use child safety seats when they take ride-share vehicles like Uber or Lyft with their young children, a new study finds.

"Our results are concerning, as ride-share services are increasingly popular," said senior study author Dr. Michelle Macy, a pediatric emergency medicine physician at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago.

"Car accidents rem...

Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is more common among new mothers than previously thought, and it's often driven by worries about things that may happen to their newborns, a new study finds.

Many new moms may keep the issue hidden, the Canadian researchers said.

"When mothers have these kinds of thoughts they might think, 'There's something wrong with me and I can't tell anyone b...

As little as half a cup of coffee each day might be enough to stunt the growth and birth weight of a baby in the womb, a new study claims.

Women who consumed an average 50 milligrams of caffeine per day -- equivalent to half a cup of coffee -- had infants that were 2.3 ounces lighter than babies born to women who didn't drink any caffeine, researchers report.

That amount is a fracti...

COVID-19 transmission is rare in schools that follow precautions such as mandatory masks, social distancing and frequent hand-washing, a new study finds.

And that's true even among close school contacts of people who test positive for the new coronavirus, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

"Schools can operate safely during a pandemic ...

Poorly controlled type 1 diabetes significantly increases a child's risk of COVID-19 complications and death, researchers warn.

The risk of complications is 10 times higher in youngsters with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes than in those with well-controlled diabetes, according to a study presented Saturday at a virtual meeting of The Endocrine Society.

"This study shows keeping d...

Calls to U.S. poison centers about incidents involving children and high-powered magnets surged more than 400% after a court overturned a ban on the magnets, a new study finds.

"Regulations on these products were effective, and the dramatic increase in the number of high-powered magnet related injuries since the ban was lifted - even compared to pre-ban numbers - is alarming," said Dr. Le...

Diphtheria could once again become a major global health problem due to vaccine and antibiotic resistance, researchers warn.

Diphtheria is a highly contagious -- and potentially deadly -- infection that can affect the nose and throat, as well as the skin.

It is caused primarily by strains of bacteria called Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which make a toxin, or poison, that ca...

Diabetes is never an easy disease to manage, but coping with type 1 diabetes can be a particularly difficult challenge for teens.

The transition from childhood to adolescence can be hard on both kids and parents, the JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation) says.

As boys and girls with type 1 diabetes enter puberty they undergo lots of changes, including increases i...

Severe winter weather has a grip on much of the United States, which increases the risk of injuries from slipping on ice, shoveling, sports such as skiing and sledding, and car crashes.

"One of the most frequently seen causes for visits to the emergency room this time of year is from slipping on icy sidewalks," said Dr. David Hasleton, senior medical director of emergency medicine and tra...

States with more gun laws have less youth gun violence, new research reveals.

For the study, the researchers examined data from several states from 2005 to 2017, and found that kids were less likely to be armed in states with more gun laws, and more likely to carry a weapon in states with fewer gun laws.

Louisiana and Arkansas had the highest percentage of armed youth in 2017 at 12....

Getting bitten by a dog or wild animal is frightening, especially for kids, but a new study may help relieve some of the worry about catching rabies.

The rabies prevention treatment KEDRAB is safe and effective for patients 17 and younger, a groundbreaking pediatric clinical trial has shown.

The trial included 30 kids with suspected or confirmed rabies exposure who were treated with...

For parents with questions about COVID-19 vaccines and children, Johns Hopkins Medicine experts offer answers.

While vaccinations for adults are underway in the United States, clinical trials for the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-authorized COVID-19 vaccines haven't yet been completed for children and teens younger than 16.

Before that age group can receive a vaccine, the ...

Nearly half -- 43% -- of all fatal car crashes involving teens and their passengers are the result of speeding, a new automobile safety report reveals.

The finding stems from an in-depth analysis of all fatal motor vehicle accidents across the United States between 2015 and 2019. During this five-year period, 4,930 teen drivers and passengers died in crashes involving speeding.

And ...

It only takes a second.

Experts are warning that unsecured televisions, bedroom dressers and other heavy furniture can crush, maim and even kill curious children, and the issue may only worsen during stay-at-home lockdowns.

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), between 2000 and 2019, 451 kids aged 17 years and younger died in tip-over accidents, the CPSC s...

Kids aren't scared when surgical staff wear personal protective equipment (PPE), and many feel reassured by use of the gear, researchers say.

Anxiety is common before, during and after surgery, and can result in complications such as pain and delayed recovery. Concerns have been raised that seeing staffers wearing PPE such as hoods, masks and gowns during the coronavirus pandemic might in...

The explosive rise in use of alcohol-based hand sanitizers during the COVID-19 pandemic has had a dangerous, unintended consequence: eye injuries among children.

Using data from French poison control and a children's hospital in Paris, researchers reported that accidental eye injuries to kids under age 18 shot up sevenfold during a five-month period last year, compared to 2019.

Puffy coats have their place, but it's not inside a car seat.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers a variety of tips for keeping your little ones safe and warm while traveling by car.

The first is to avoid dressing children in puffy coats or snowsuits before buckling them in, because car seat straps won't tighten enough. That creates a danger that the fluffy padding will ...

Toddler behavior won't always be good. Outbursts are normal.

Yet, you can also use those aggravating moments to help shape your little one's behavior, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

Start by teaching the "house rules," the AAP advises. Put away valuables you don't want your toddler to touch. Consider setting up an area with books and toys where your toddler c...

If you're trying to decide whether to have your child tested for COVID-19, talk with your pediatrician, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) suggests.

Children and teens with COVID-19 symptoms should be tested immediately. This is especially important if they're going to school, playing sports or have in-person jobs, according to the academy.

Testing is also recommended before m...

A new year can be a fresh start for you and your kids -- and perhaps no year has needed a fresh start more than this one. So, a leading doctors' group is offering parents tips for a healthy "reset" in 2021.

Get immunized. First of all, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is recommending you make sure your family is up to date on vaccines. If your family hasn't ye...

For decades, women have commonly been given oxygen during childbirth, but a new research review finds little evidence it benefits newborns.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that women be given supplemental oxygen when fetal heart monitoring shows an abnormal heart rate. That's based on the possibility that oxygen deprivation is causing the problem.

...

Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.

Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.

When these small rare e...

As scientists worked on COVID-19 vaccines, other researchers were addressing a question: Once shots are available, will parents vaccinate their kids against the new coronavirus?

The answer: Younger parents are much less likely than older ones to plan to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19.

"Parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves and their children against ...

Children should be included in COVID-19 vaccine trials at the earliest possible stage, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians says.

If that's not done, youngsters' lives could be at risk, according to the 67,000-member American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

"If we do not add children to these research trials very soon, there will be a significant delay in when children are able to ac...

Pregnant women with COVID-19 have little risk of developing severe symptoms, as do their newborns, a new study finds.

In fact, 95% of these women have good outcomes, and just 3% of their babies test positive for COVID-19, researchers say.

"For 5% of COVID-19-positive pregnant women, however -- those who get very sick -- the risks to both mother and baby are significant," said study ...

More children and young adults are drowning in winter lakes because of warming temperatures that create unstable lake ice, a new study finds.

A team of international researchers examined several decades of data, including 4,000 drownings and population information from throughout Canada, 14 U.S. states, Estonia, Germany, Latvia, Finland, Russia, Sweden and regions of Italy and Japan. They...

Nearly one in five American parents described themselves as "hesitant about childhood shots" in 2019, a new U.S. government study finds.

That was fewer than the one in four who expressed hesitancy about vaccines in 2018.

The new research found real consequences from vaccine hesitancy. Rates of flu vaccination were 26 percentage points lower in children of "vaccine-hesitant" parents ...

New parents preparing a bottle for their baby should know the infant may ingest unwanted microplastics along with the nourishing formula, a new study warns.

High levels of microplastic particles are released from baby bottles during formula preparation, researchers discovered during lab testing.

Infants are likely exposed to an average daily dose of nearly 1.6 million microp...

To keep your baby safe while sleeping, experts recommend practicing the "ABCs" of sleep.

Babies should sleep alone, on their back and in a crib. That's the best way to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

SIDS is the unexplained death of a child under 1 year of age that usually occurs during sleep. The United States has about 3,500 sleep-relate...

When parents have concerns about the safety of childhood vaccinations, it can be tough to change their minds, as a new study shows.

The study involved "vaccine-hesitant" parents -- a group distinct from the staunch "anti-vaxxer" crowd. They have worries about one or more routine vaccines, and question whether the benefits for their child are worthwhile.

Even though those par...

The truly scary thing about Halloween this year is that it's occurring during a pandemic, but there are safe ways to celebrate, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says.

Suggestions include: virtual costume parties; physically distant, outdoor costume parades; Halloween-themed craft making; movie nights at home; decorating pumpkins; and making favorite treats.

"Many kid...

COVID-19 has led to widespread job loss in the United States. And now a new study reports that when unemployment rates rise, so do hospitalizations of children.

For the study, researchers analyzed 12 years of data (2002 to 2014) from 14 states. They found that for every 1% increase in unemployment, there was a 2% increase in child hospitalizations for all causes, among them d...

Off-road vehicles are meant for exactly that -- riding on rough terrain including mud, sand and uneven ground.

A new study found that combining two questionable ideas -- driving all-terrain and other off-road vehicles on paved roads in the dark -- is particularly dangerous, especially since alcohol is often involved.

"It's lack of visibility and also what people are doing at...

In a rare bit of good news tied to the coronavirus pandemic, researchers say pediatric fractures plummeted by nearly 60% this past spring.

Investigators say the finding likely reflects the sudden evaporation of organized sports and curtailed playground use due to the threat of COVID-19.

"We compared fracture incidence in the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic -- March...

Facebook chatter from the anti-vaccination movement now frames the issue as one of civil liberties, a new study finds.

As a COVID-19 vaccine gets closer to becoming a reality, opposition from so-called anti-vaxxer groups could become a political movement, researchers warn.

For the study, the investigators looked at more than 250,000 posts on 204 Facebook pages opposing vac...

This Halloween may be especially challenging for parents of children with asthma and allergies, as they also have to guard against COVID-19.

"Every year we send out tips on how to keep your kids with allergies and asthma symptom-free as they celebrate one of their favorite holidays," said allergist Dr. J. Allen Meadows, president of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunolo...

The sting of fire ants can be painful and even deadly -- and the threat rises during fall across the southeastern United States.

At this time of year, fire ants move to warm surfaces such as concrete slabs or asphalt roads, according to the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI), which urges people to take precautions.

A child can be stung walking through...

Parents who choose to forgo or delay their children's vaccinations may quickly find themselves without a pediatrician.

Just over half (51%) of pediatric offices in the United States have a policy to dismiss families that refuse childhood vaccines, a nationwide survey found. Thirty-seven percent of pediatricians themselves said they often dismissed families for refusing vaccines, ...