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Health News Results - 299

The cataclysmic eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 A.D. created temperatures so hot that one poor soul's brain was transformed into glass, researchers report.

Archaeologists working at the site of Herculaneum -- the other city wiped out in the eruption, alongside Pompeii -- discovered small bits of black glass inside the skull of one of the victims.

Tests of the glassy materia...

While health problems from childhood exposure to lead and mercury are on the decline, these and other toxic chemicals continue to take a toll, a new study reports.

The progress likely owes to decades of restrictions on use of heavy metals. But researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City said that exposure to other toxic chemicals -- especially flame retardants ...

Wildfires like the ones that have ravaged Australia in recent months are likely to become more common as climate change continues to wreak havoc on the planet, a new study suggests.

The Australian wildfires prompted British researchers to review 57 studies published since 2013.

All of the studies show an association between human-driven climate change and increased frequency...

If you can't quite bring yourself to declutter your home and toss out unneeded possessions, one reason why might surprise you.

Researchers say the emotional tug you feel might be loneliness.

"When consumers make decisions about how to get rid of multiple possessions, perhaps when they are moving, it is a time when they are likely to feel lonely," said Catherine Cole. She's a...

Nearly two decades after terrorists attacked New York's World Trade Center, certain cancers are striking police and recovery workers who saved lives, recovered bodies and cleaned up the wreckage.

This particular group of responders appears to have an increased risk of developing thyroid cancer, leukemia and prostate cancer, as well as a slightly elevated overall risk of cancer, resear...

If climate change continues unabated, the United States should prepare for an increase in deaths from injuries, a new study claims.

Looking at data on injury deaths and temperature over 38 years, researchers found a correlation between unusually high temperatures and increased rates of death from a range of causes -- traffic accidents, drownings, assault and suicide.

The res...

Wildfires are becoming increasingly common, and along with the rising environmental damage, a new study finds more breathing problems for kids.

In December 2017, a small wildfire in San Diego County, Calif., resulted in 16 more kids a day than usual showing up in emergency departments with trouble breathing, respiratory distress, wheezing or asthma.

Before it was over, the...

Decades-banned pesticides apparently continue to interfere with fetal growth during U.S. pregnancies, a new study reports.

DDT was banned in 1972 in the United States, but low levels of it and other organic chemical pollutants can still be found in the blood of pregnant American women, researchers reported online Dec. 30 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Women carrying even low levels ...

People with high levels of a common insecticide in their system are far more vulnerable to heart disease, a new study suggests.

According to Wei Bao, assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, and colleagues, people who have been exposed to pyrethroid insecticides are three times more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than those wit...

Your smartphone, television and computer screens may be contaminating your home with potentially toxic chemicals, a new study suggests.

An international team of researchers found the chemicals -- called liquid crystal monomers -- in nearly half of dozens of samples of household dust they collected.

Liquid crystal monomers are used in a wide number of products ranging from fl...

There's one type of green Christmas that's likely to bring joy to gift-givers and recipients alike, a new Canadian study suggests.

That's one based on green consumerism -- a push to buy gifts produced in ways that protect the natural environment.

For this study, researchers at Concordia University in Montreal asked volunteers how a number of green and not-green products mad...

Rising obesity rates worldwide may be contributing to the climate crisis, researchers report.

"Our analysis suggests that, in addition to beneficial effects on morbidity, mortality and health care costs, managing obesity can favorably affect the environment as well," said study corresponding author Faidon Magkos, from the department of nutrition, exercise and sports at the University ...

Toddlers have an increased risk of allergies if they are exposed to multiple indoor pollutants in their first years of life, a new study finds.

It included 108 mother-child pairs. Researchers assessed exposures to various household pollutants such as pet dander and tobacco smoke while the women were pregnant, then when children were aged 6 months, 1 year and 2 years.

A skin ...

The risk of new superbugs that pose a threat to human health and food crops is much higher than previously thought, new genetic research shows.

There's been an uptick in the number of laboratory studies showing how just one mutation could create highly infectious or "hypervirulent" strains of disease-causing bacteria, fungi and water molds.

These include microbes that cause ...

If you are pregnant and live in a rural area of the United States, new research shows that you're at higher risk of life-threatening complications or death during or after childbirth.

"Our study suggests that geographic disparities may put rural women at an increased risk of requiring lifesaving interventions during or immediately after delivering a baby," said study senior author Dr....

Everyone quickly shoos houseflies off their dinner plates, but exactly how disease-ridden are these pesky insects?

New research reveals that flies do pick up plenty of microbes from the nearby environment -- germs that can then be transmitted to your food or drink.

But there's also reason to relax: Experts agreed that houseflies don't rank high on the list of disease threats...

Antarctica is one of the loneliest places on Earth.

Endless expanses of white give way to almost complete darkness during the long winter months. Companionship is largely limited to those who've joined you in these achingly cold wilds.

That overwhelming isolation is so great that it appears to cause physical and functional deterioration in the human brain, a new study shows....

Rising temperatures might help trigger premature birth, a new study finds, suggesting that global warming could deliver more "preemie" babies.

Looking at 20 years of data on heat waves and birth timing across the United States, researchers "estimate that an average of 25,000 infants per year were born earlier as a result of heat exposure."

Taken another way, the research sug...

Even a little exposure to the fine particles of air pollution can translate into higher hospitalization rates for a number of common conditions among older Americans, a new study suggests.

"The study shows that the health dangers and economic impacts of air pollution are significantly larger than previously understood," said study author Yaguang Wei, a doctoral candidate at the Harva...

Lab-altered mosquitoes have made a big dent in the spread of dengue fever, researchers report.

How? Australian scientists released mosquitoes carrying a bacteria that prevents transmission of the dengue virus.

The strategy resulted in a 76% decrease in dengue transmission in a community in Indonesia that has frequent dengue outbreaks. Similar reductions were seen in an u...

Climate change has increased the size, strength and destructive force of hurricanes that strike the United States, according to a new Danish study.

It also reported that the most severe hurricanes are more than three times as common as they were 100 years ago.

The conclusions are based on a new way of analyzing historical hurricane data.

Scientists at the Universi...

Taking that trek through the woods with your child may do more than build strong muscles.

New research suggests that time spent in nature is also good for their mental and emotional well-being.

"This research shows that children experience profound and diverse benefits through regular contact with nature. Contact with the wild improves children's well-being, motivation and c...

Many people who tried going meatless one day a week to call attention to food and climate change continued after the campaign ended, a new study says.

Researchers surveyed 320 households from Bedford, N.Y., that took part in the town's "Meatless Monday" campaign in 2018. For 12 weeks, participants ate no meat one day a week.

In a survey six months later, nearly 57% of re...

Children will face more food shortages and infections if climate change continues unchecked, researchers from the World Health Organization and 34 other institutions warn.

Climate change is already harming children's health. And they're at risk for lifelong health threats unless the world meets Paris Agreement targets to limit warming to well below 2 degrees Celsius, the scientists re...

Don't count on potted plants to keep your home's air clean.

Dispelling a common belief, researchers at Drexel University in Philadelphia found that natural ventilation does a far better job than houseplants in maintaining air quality in homes and offices.

"This has been a common misconception for some time. Plants are great, but they don't actually clean indoor air quickly e...

Rural Americans die more often from potentially preventable causes than their urban counterparts, a new government study shows.

These causes include cancer, heart disease, injury, respiratory disease and stroke, according to U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention research.

Between 2010 and 2017, rural counties saw a widening disparity in preventable deaths from c...

It sounds scary, but the changes are only temporary: Researchers report that heart cells grown in space showed altered gene expression.

But just 10 days after being returned to Earth, the heart cells returned to normal.

Once stem cells grew into heart cells aboard the International Space Station, their exposure to microgravity changed the expression of thousands of genes.

A global coalition of more than 11,000 scientists warns that planet Earth is facing a "climate emergency" that will cause "untold human suffering" unless drastic steps are taken.

The warming climate is already taking a toll on human health, causing widespread hunger and illness that will grow exponentially worse, said the warning's lead author, William Ripple. He's a professor of ecol...

Clocks were set back one hour on Sunday, but some health experts say it might be better if time changes ended for good.

It's more than an inconvenience, it's a potential health threat, they warn.

Over time, daylight saving time (DST) eliminates bright morning light that's crucial to synchronizing your biologic clock, possibly putting people at increased risk of heart attack,...

Eco-friendly asthma inhalers could lower both greenhouse emissions and medical costs, according to a new British study.

Inhalers use hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellants to atomize and pump out the medication, but HFAs are potent greenhouse gases. And metered-dose inhalers are responsible for 3.9% of the carbon footprint of the National Health Service (NHS) in the United Kingdom, t...

Smoke from the wildfires raging in California poses a serious health risk -- even to those far away from the blazes, an expert warns.

"Smoke can present special health hazards to humans and pets, especially children, older adults and those with chronic respiratory problems such as emphysema, asthma, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and others," sa...

After the University of California, San Francisco, banned sales of sugary drinks, employees started downing less liquid sugar -- and their waistlines showed it.

In a before-and-after study, researchers found that the ban, begun in 2015, cut employees' intake of sugary drinks by almost 50%. And within 10 months, their collective waist size had shrunk by almost an inch.

Th...

Eating right is not only good for you, it's good for Mother Earth as well, a new study shows.

Vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains, olive oil and fish all reduce your risk of death and disease when consumed as part of a regular diet, findings show.

They're also mostly associated with low environmental impacts.

On the other hand, red meat both increases your risk ...

Your great granddaddy may have been right about the weather worsening his arthritis.

People with chronic pain conditions are more likely to suffer pain on humid and windy days, according to a study that used smartphones to assess pain-weather connections.

"The results of this study could be important for patients in the future for two reasons," said study leader Will Dixon, ...

Bald eagles in the United States are facing another challenge: Nearly one-third are infected with a newly identified virus, researchers say.

The virus is called bald eagle hepacivirus (BeHV). The researchers discovered it while trying to determine the cause of Wisconsin River Eagle Syndrome (WRES), a fatal disease seen in bald eagles in the Lower Wisconsin River area.

The sc...

Climate change could trigger much bigger heat waves by mid-century, U.S. researchers report.

Previous research has predicted that the number and intensity of heat waves will increase, but this study is the first to examine changes in their potential physical size.

"As the physical size of these affected regions increases, more people will be exposed to heat stress," said lea...

Could living near the coast be an inexpensive balm for mental troubles?

"Our research suggests, for the first time, that people in poorer households living close to the coast experience fewer symptoms of mental health disorders," said researcher Dr. Jo Garrett, from the University of Exeter, in England.

"When it comes to mental health, this 'protective' zone could play a use...

Brexit has thrown the United Kingdom into political and economic uncertainty, but it might have actually triggered a psychotic break in one man, a new report suggests.

The 2016 Brexit referendum started the process of the U.K. leaving the European Union.

Three weeks after the referendum, a middle-aged man was taken by paramedics to the hospital in an acute psychotic state.

When parents smoke, their kids may face a higher risk of a common heart rhythm problem decades later, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adults who grew up with smokers were more likely to develop atrial fibrillation, versus those with nonsmoking parents.

Atrial fibrillation (or "a-fib") is a heart arrhythmia in which the atria -- the heart's upper chambers -- peri...

Scientists have found one more way Flipper is a lot like people: The sharp rise in antibiotic resistance affecting humans is also happening to dolphins.

The discovery stems from a 13-year study of bottlenose dolphins in Florida's Indian River Lagoon.

"We've been able to provide a large database of information in order to continue learning from these impressive animals," sai...

Stricter U.S. government standards for drinking water have reduced arsenic violations by public water systems, proving such safety regulations work, researchers say.

Public water systems provide more than 80% of the nation's drinking water.

The new standard was introduced in 2001. Since then, the percentage of public water systems in violation fell from 1.3% in 2008 ...

The number of U.S. states with adult obesity rates above 35% reached an all-time high of nine in 2018, a new report says.

In 2018, the nine states with adult obesity rates above 35% were: Alabama, Arkansas, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and West Virginia.

That's two more than the year before. As recently as 2012, no state topped 35...

The firefighters who flooded into Ground Zero on 9/11 put their lives on the line to help others. Now, a new study shows they are still paying the price for their selflessness.

Those who were first on the scene or worked for months among the ruins of the World Trade Center disaster in 2001 have an increased risk of heart disease, stroke and heart attack that persists to this day, rese...

Climate change-caused increases in heat and humidity could put Muslims making the pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia in "extreme danger," a new study warns.

This pilgrimage, known as the Hajj, involves several days of activities, including 20 to 30 hours outdoors.

The timing of the Hajj varies. This year, it was Aug. 9 to 14, and next year it will be July 28 to Aug. 2, dur...

The danger to teenagers' lungs from e-cigarettes isn't only occurring in those who vape: A new report finds many young bystanders are breathing in "secondhand" fumes.

The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Youth Tobacco Survey, and found that about one-third of middle and high school students were exposed to vaping aerosols in 2018.

That's an increase of about ...

Your lunch leftovers are doing no favors for urban birds' hearts, new research shows.

Fatty food scraps may be boosting the cholesterol levels of crows in U.S. cities, but whether it's a threat to their health isn't clear.

A team from Hamilton College in Clinton, N.Y., analyzed blood cholesterol levels of 140 crow nestlings in urban and rural areas of California. Those in ur...

It's a horrible fate: You take a cool dip in the ocean and become infected with flesh-eating bacteria.

Climate change is making this terrifying scenario more common in the northern part of the United States, one infectious disease expert says.

These infections are caused by Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. There are about 80,000 such infections each year in the United Sta...

Breathing in smoggy air, especially in the colder months, may be especially taxing for the heart, new research out of Europe suggests.

Polish researchers found that high levels of air pollution were tied to spikes in procedures to open blocked heart arteries. This was especially apparent in winter, when pollution levels were highest, a new study finds.

The study included nea...

Tailpipe pollution might pose a real health threat to aging eyes, according to a new study out of Taiwan.

Researchers there found that exposure to high levels of two car exhaust pollutants nearly doubled the odds of age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

It's one of the most common causes of vision loss in older people.

The study is the first of its kind to "demo...

Texas cities are in danger of major measles outbreaks because an alarming number of school kids are unvaccinated, researchers warn.

Vaccination rates in the state have declined since 2003 and a computer simulation by University of Pittsburgh researchers found that an additional 5% decrease could increase the size of a measles outbreak by as much as 4,000% in some cities.

...

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