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Results for search "DNA".

Health News Results - 23

Although much of the genetic makeup of humans has been mapped, hundreds of missing DNA sequences remain.

Until now.

Scientists from the U.S. National Human Genome Research Institute report they have produced the complete DNA sequence of a single human chromosome. That discovery could allow researchers to sequence the entire human genome.

"This accomplishment begins...

A simple blood test for dozens of cancers is in the works.

Researchers say their test can detect more than 50 kinds of cancer at early stages and pinpoint their location in the body.

"If these findings are validated, it will be feasible to consider how this test might be incorporated into a broader cancer screening strategy," said lead researcher Dr. Michael Seiden, preside...

Genetic mutations that put some younger people at high risk for severe illness from the new coronavirus will be investigated in an international study.

Plans call for enrolling 500 patients worldwide who are under age 50, have been diagnosed with COVID-19 and admitted to an intensive care unit, and have no underlying health problems such as diabetes, heart disease or lung disease.

...

It has spread across the globe in just a few short months, sickening hundreds of thousands, but the new coronavirus has the dubious distinction of not really being a living organism, biologists say.

"Viruses aren't considered alive -- in class, I call them pseudo-alive," said Eric Mendenhall, an associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

...

The racism black Americans face may age them prematurely, a new study suggests.

This aging is occurring at the cellular level -- specifically, the shortening of telomeres, researchers say.

Telomeres are the repetitive sequences of DNA that sit at the tips of your chromosomes -- like the plastic caps at the ends of a shoelace -- and help keep the chromosomes from fraying. <...

Could the DNA from a patient's breast tumor help doctors spot whether stray cancer cells are still in her blood?

That's what a small, new study suggests is possible. If the findings are replicated in a larger study, such a test might help determine whether a treatment is working or not. It also has the potential to reduce unnecessary additional treatments for breast cancer.

...

You might think that stress affects you only emotionally or that a lack of sleep simply leaves you feeling cranky. But these are among the many lifestyle factors that can lead to health problems because of changes that they cause within your body's cells.

Packed inside every cell is your DNA and its strands of chromosomes. Chromosomes are protected, top and bottom, by sections called ...

For women, predicting when they'll reach menopause is anyone's guess. But if you want to get some foresight, you should ask your mother.

For most women, menopause begins at around 52. But for thousands of women it starts much later, and for some, a lot earlier. Those whose menopause starts later may also be looking at a longer life expectancy, researchers have found.

Smoking...

Can a DNA test predict a person's future heart health? Perhaps, researchers say.

A team of Canadian researchers found that by analyzing a person's entire genome, it might be possible to predict their future heart disease risk.

The so-called "polygenic risk score" analysis looks for key heart disease indicators -- genetic "biomarkers" -- along with an individual's entire g...

When couples experience recurrent pregnancy loss, it's natural for them to want to know why. Now, a new study suggests that sperm DNA damage could be a factor.

Recurrent pregnancy loss is defined as the consecutive loss of three or more pregnancies before 20 weeks' gestation. It affects up to 2 percent of couples and, in many cases, it is difficult to ident...

The controversy over a Chinese scientist who claimed he created gene-edited babies has prompted the U.S. National Institutes of Health to join an international moratorium on such research.

"Today, leading scientists and ethicists from seven countries have called for an international moratorium on the use of genetic editing to modify the human germline for clinical purposes," NIH Direc...

The largest study to date of the genetic underpinnings of Alzheimer's has uncovered five new gene mutations that make people more vulnerable to the memory-robbing disease.

The international team of scientists analyzed the DNA of more than 94,000 people collected by the four groups that make up the International Genomic Alzheimer's Project.

"The ability to combine data from s...

A blood test may one day replace invasive tissue biopsies as a pain-free way to guide treatment in lung cancer patients, new research suggests.

The so-called "liquid biopsy" can quickly identify tumor gene mutations that match targeted drug therapies -- potentially boosting patient survival.

The new findings present "a convincing argument for use of the liquid biopsy as a fi...

A large, new study has uncovered 24 genetic variations that help separate the apple-shaped people from the pear-shaped ones.

Researchers said the findings help explain why some people are prone to carrying any excess weight around the belly. But more importantly, they could eventually shed light on the biology of diseases linked to obesity -- particularly abdominal obesity.

...

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is easily transmitted during sex, but it is unlikely to be passed by the hands, Canadian researchers report.

The virus, which infects the skin and genitals, is a cause of several types of cancer in both men and women, including cervical cancer, as well as tumors of the vagina, penis, anus and throat.

Because HPV strains on your hand usually match t...

A program that maps out the genes of newborns has allowed researchers to identify risks for some inherited childhood conditions, many of which can be prevented.

The so-called BabySeq Project discovered that slightly more than 9 percent of infants carry genes that put them at risk for medical conditions as they reach childhood.

"The BabySeq Project is the first randomized tri...

Mating with Neanderthals helped boost modern humans' ability to fight novel viruses in Europe and Asia, a new study contends.

Before vanishing about 40,000 years ago, Neanderthals interbred with modern humans who had migrated out of Africa. As a result, many modern Europeans and Asians have about 2 percent of Neanderthal DNA in their genomes, the researchers explained.

Some ...

Only a small percentage of Americans have had their DNA analyzed -- but many are tempted to try it, according to new research.

For the study, University of Michigan researchers surveyed nearly 1,000 adults aged 50 to 64. While curious about their ancestry or health risks, the majority said they fear they'll worry excessively if they learn they have genetic links to progressive diseas...

A blood test can predict which lymphoma patients will respond well to normal treatment and which may need a more aggressive approach, researchers report.

Their study included 217 patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma, the most common type of the blood cancer non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The blood test checks levels of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in patients before and after...

E-cigarettes produce chemicals that can damage a person's DNA, the first step on a path that might lead to cancer, a new study reports.

The saliva of a small group of e-cigarette users contained increased levels of three DNA-damaging compounds, the researchers said. These chemicals are formaldehyde, acrolein and methylglyoxal.

Further, four of the five e-cigarette users show...

Evolutionary changes in the human brain may be responsible for psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, new research suggests.

The researchers identified long, noncoding stretches of DNA (called "repeat arrays") in a gene that governs calcium transport in the brain. Their findings were published Aug. 9 in the American Journal of Human Genetics.

<...

People who have frequent recurrences of a common skin cancer may be at increased risk of a range of other cancers, a new study suggests.

Researchers found the heightened risk among patients who'd had many bouts of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) -- a highly treatable form of skin cancer diagnosed in over 3 million Americans each year.

Patients who'd developed at least six BCCs ov...

If you ever wonder why you never managed to finish college, some of the explanation may lie in your DNA.

Scientists report that they have pinpointed nearly 1,300 genetic variants that appear to be associated with how far someone may go in school.

The findings move researchers "in a clearer direction in understanding the genetic architecture of complex behavior traits like e...