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Men and women have similar reasons for becoming – or not becoming – an organ donor, according to a new study. Yet women appear more willing to donate their organs to family members or strangers.

The results, published Sept. 24 in the Journal of the American Heart Association, suggest improving communication among family members about organ donation wishes could help increase ...

On a morning this past February, 16-year-old Carson Cathey got up, went downstairs and scarfed down a donut and glass of milk. His father, Patrick, also was awake, and they had a conversation before Carson decided to return to bed.

About two hours later, Patrick heard a thud. He found Carson – a 6-foot-4, 282-pound defensive lineman at Oswego High School in Illinois – lying on his bed...

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Younger women who undergo radiation for cancer in the left breast have a heightened risk of heart disease years later, a new study finds.

Among women who received radiation therapy for left-sided breast cancer, 10.5% developed coronary artery disease over the next 27 years, researchers found. That was close to double the rat...

For some people, the subject of hunger conjures up tragic images of starving people with swollen bellies in blighted, desolate parts of the world.

In this country, the picture is different. Food insecurity affects millions of people in the United States whose suffering may not appear so grim on the outside, but whose mental and physical health are still threatened by hunger and poor nutri...

Women with a history of migraine headaches may suffer severe hot flashes during menopause, and this combo may boost their risk for heart disease, researchers say.

Migraine doesn't cause more or worse hot flashes — or vice versa. But both are believed to be related to changes in blood vessels known as neurovascular dysregulation, according to Dr. Stephanie Faubion, medical director of th...

TUESDAY, Sept. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Many middle-aged adults with apparently healthy hearts have a "silent" buildup of fatty deposits in their arteries, a large, new study shows.

Researchers found that of more than 25,000 50- to 64-year-olds, about 42% had signs of atherosclerosis — a buildup of "plaques" in the arteries that can lead to a heart attack or strok...

Patrick Wright was back home after ringing in the new year with family and friends at his grandmother's house.

Around 2:30 a.m., he woke up to go to the bathroom. He noticed he had no feeling in his left hand but figured it was numb because he'd been sleeping on it.

He headed to the kitchen for a glass of water but was so thirsty that he bent down to drink directly out of the faucet...

A year of exercise training helped to preserve or increase the youthful elasticity of the heart muscle among people showing early signs of heart failure, a small study shows.

The new research, published Sept. 20 in the American Heart Association journal Circulation, bolsters the idea that "exercise is medicine," an important shift in approach, the researchers wrote.

The stu...

Physically removing a blood clot in the brain is a safe and effective treatment for pregnant women having a stroke, a new study suggests.

Stroke during pregnancy remains rare, but the risk increases during pregnancy and for up to 12 weeks after giving birth, or postpartum.

The most common type is ischemic stroke, where a clot blocks blood flow in the brain. Mechanical thrombectomy ...

About a month into the COVID-19 pandemic, LeCount Holmes saw on television that Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan was within a mile of his house for a big announcement.

Because Prince George's County was one of the areas hardest hit by the coronavirus, a former regional hospital was being reopened earlier than planned to provide treatment to another 135 patients.

Holmes hopped on his bike, ...

FRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Treating sickle cell anemia with the drug hydroxyurea may also reverse related heart abnormalities, a new study suggests.

Heart issues are common among people with sickle cell disease. Among them are enlargement of the heart and an impaired ability to relax heart muscles, a condition called diastolic dysfunction that can lead t...

Diseases that can rob you of vision as you age also appear to be tied to an increased risk for dementia, a new study finds.

Specifically, age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and diabetes-related eye disease were linked with a higher likelihood of dementia, researchers in China said. However, one other common eye ailment, glaucoma, was not linked to dementia risk.

The new st...

Jeff Vallance jump-started every day with a 4-mile run. It woke him up and kept him feeling fit. As an expert in chronic disease management, he knew the importance of staying active.

He also knew the signs of a stroke. When his right foot started to go numb, scuffing the sidewalk and making him stumble on his daily jog, he grew concerned. Then his right arm started to tingle, followed by ...

From the start, Norma Cavazos was surrounded by friends and family who were vaccine skeptics: "No one was going to take it, including myself. That was something that we were all adamant about."

As a public health worker for the state of Texas, she was aware of the coronavirus long before people around her in Harlingen, a city about 14 miles north of the U.S.-Mexico border in the Rio Grand...

The heart rates of people sync up when listening to a story, a new study finds.

"There's a lot of literature demonstrating that people synchronize their physiology with each other. But the premise is that somehow you're interacting and physically present [in] the same place," said co-author Lucas Parra, a professor of biomedical engineering at City College of New York.

"What we hav...

It is estimated that thousands of air travelers around the world have a cardiac arrest each year, with nearly a quarter of those occurring on a plane, according to new research that points to the success of CPR and AEDs in keeping survival rates higher than the national average.

The new study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, comes at the end of a summer...

Most people Pamela Anderson Bowen meets wonder about her accent. Sometimes they try to guess the origin. Maybe Russia? What about Sweden?

"I'm from here," the North Carolina resident will answer. Then she waits for the inevitable follow-up question about where she grew up and developed the unusual lilt in her voice.

Pam has lived in North Carolina most of her life, except for a few ...

MONDAY, Sept. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) – If you often feel stressed out, your blood pressure may rise over time alongside higher odds for other heart concerns, a new study indicates.

Researchers found adults with normal blood pressure but high levels of stress hormones were more likely to develop high blood pressure in six to seven years than those with lower stress hormone levels.

...

On a frigid morning this February, 44-year-old Renick Blosser set out on his typical Saturday routine. He grabbed a cup of coffee and took his dogs for a walk in the snow near his home in suburban Akron, Ohio.

By the time he returned, he knew something was wrong.

Suddenly, his chest tightened. He texted his wife, Megan, who was at work, that he didn't feel well. Maybe it's gas or an...

Every second counts after having a stroke, and rapid-response mobile stroke units can start clot-busting drugs quickly, potentially staving off lasting damage, new research finds.

Mobile stroke units are special ambulances equipped with imaging equipment and staffed by experts who can diagnose and treat strokes in the moments before arriving at the hospital. Typically, people who may have...

Pomegranates can be a little intimidating. Cutting one open requires some precision. And are they even worth the work to free all those little ruby red buds inside? Nutritionists think so.

"Pomegranates are high in dietary fiber and antioxidants," said Penny Kris-Etherton, the Evan Pugh University Professor of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State University in University Park, Pennsylvania....

Leaky heart valves can put pregnant women at serious risk, according to a large study that runs counter to established practice.

The condition used to be considered relatively harmless during pregnancy. But this analysis by Johns Hopkins University researchers of more than 20,000 individual medical records reveals that heart valve disease puts women at risk for bleeding, high blood pressu...

Measuring waist circumference may be an essential way to help predict who will develop diabetes among Black people with normal blood sugar levels, according to a new study. The problem is, researchers say, waist size often is overlooked at health visits.

The study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, focused on how to best determine the risk of diabetes i...

Dr. Dipika Aggarwal sat in a Kansas City, Kansas, diner on a Tuesday afternoon two years ago sipping coffee and enjoying a mushroom omelet and toast.

Only a month before, the neurologist had returned to work after going through surgery, radiation and chemotherapy for stage 4 colon cancer. She chose to ease back in and started taking care of people admitted to the hospital after stroke, se...

People with HIV have an increased risk of sudden cardiac death, a new study warns, especially if the virus isn't well-controlled.

Sudden cardiac death occurs when the heart unexpectedly stops beating, usually due to an abrupt electrical malfunction.

"People living with HIV are already known to have a higher risk of heart attack, stroke, heart failure, blood clots in the lungs and pe...

Food cravings. Everybody gets them.

Smelling brownies in the oven. Hearing a commercial for a salty chip. Seeing a favorite childhood candy bar at the checkout. They all can awaken memories that drive food cravings.

But what if they also come from a sensory system that has nothing to do with the nose, ears or eyes? A growing body of research says they do. Deep in the gut hides the e...

Marijuana has been linked to a doubling in the risk of a heart attack in younger adults, no matter how they use it, a new study reports.

Eighteen- to 44-year-olds who used pot were twice as likely to have a heart attack compared with non-users, whether they smoked, vaped or ate their weed, researchers found.

"We found it wasn't only smoking that had this kind of effect. The effect s...

At 13, Alison Conklin passed out while playing in a basketball tournament. When she collapsed again during a competitive game of floor hockey, her mother took her to see a cardiologist.

An echocardiogram of Alison's heart showed the wall between the two bottom chambers of her heart was bigger than it should be. She was diagnosed with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

HCM causes heart wal...

Doctors and researchers who helped care for college athletes with COVID-19 and set guidelines for a safe return to play now plan to study the long-term effects of the virus. The work could have a lasting impact beyond the pandemic.

The research stems from trailblazing collaborations between cardiologists and sports medicine physicians across the country who wanted to better understand the...

Sugar is killing Americans in droves, according to researchers who found that reducing the sweetener in packaged foods and beverages could prevent more than 2 million strokes, heart attacks and cardiac arrests.

Less sugary packaged foods and drinks would also curb nearly a half-million heart-related deaths and an even greater number of diabetes cases in the United States, according to the...

Lisa Wiles was in the kitchen prepping dinner in April 2020 when she heard her husband, Dan, shout an expletive from the other room.

She figured it was a reaction to the news. Still, she went to check on him.

"His eyes weren't focused on anything, and he was making these horrible breathing sounds," Lisa said. "I thought at first he was choking."

She shouted at him to see if he...

Along with other dangers, the aftermath of Hurricane Ida could pose significant heart health risks.

Stress and trauma from the storm that slammed into Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and other states could increase heart risk, and the impact may be more significant for heart disease and stroke patients, the American Heart Association (AHA) warns.

For example, it may be more difficul...

With Labor Day festivities approaching, you might want to think twice about that cocktail. Or at least you should avoid that second round, especially if you have a history of your heart beating irregularly.

A new study appears to confirm the existence of "holiday heart syndrome" -- a higher risk of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), after even moderate drinking.

While past studies have su...

A good Samaritan can save the life of someone in cardiac arrest if a portable defibrillator is nearby. Now, a pilot study suggests a new way to get the devices into bystanders' hands: drones.

The study, done in Sweden, found that drone delivery was a feasible way to get automated external defibrillators (AEDs) to the scene of a cardiac arrest. In fact, the drones typically beat ambulances...

Is your job good for your health?

From the factory floor to the phone bank, from the boardroom to the emergency room, it's a complicated question to consider as we pursue paychecks and navigate careers.

"Health isn't just what we eat and how physically active we are," said Yvonne Michael, professor of epidemiology at Drexel University's School of Public Health in Philadelphia. "It's...

The greener your neighborhood, the lower your risk of heart disease.

That's the takeaway from a new study, which reported that adding to a neighborhood's green space can have a big payoff for public health.

"For the cost of one emergency room visit for a heart attack, trees could be planted in a neighborhood with 100 residents and potentially prevent ten heart diseases," said study ...

New research offers further evidence of a link between gum disease and heart disease.

The ongoing Swedish study previously found that gum disease ("periodontitis") was much more common in first-time heart attack patients than in a group of healthy people.

In this follow-up study, the researchers examined whether gum disease was associated with an increased risk of new heart problems...

It was the evening of Jan. 30, 2007, when Mike Maddux got the phone call from his stepfather.

His mother was in the bathroom with the door locked and her husband couldn't get her to come out. Could Mike help?

Mike, who lived nearby, got there within an hour. His mother still refused to open the door. So they called paramedics, who finally convinced her to open the bathroom door.

...

Black people in need of a new heart are less likely than their white peers to get a transplant, and when they do, they're more likely to die afterward, according to new research.

The study, published Wednesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, analyzed the impact of changes made in 2018 to how transplants are allocated with the aim of expanding availability.

That yea...

A broad education effort about cardiac arrest seemed to improve care and save lives, a study has found. But even as the response to cardiac arrest improved in important ways, survival rates rose only in white people.

"What this makes us want to do is make sure we have efforts in place to recognize and respond to cardiac arrest in Black communities in a rapid way," said the study's senior ...

If you're a 60-something with heart disease, it's not too late to give your ticker the benefits of a regular workout.

Swiss researchers found that survival rates among heart patients who became active later in life were nearly the same as those who'd been exercising for years.

"Continuing an active lifestyle over the years is associated with the greatest longevity," said study autho...

An apple and a pear a day may help keep blood pressure under control -- a benefit partly explained by gut bacteria, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that adults who regularly ate certain foods -- apples, pears, berries and red wine -- tended to have lower blood pressure than their peers.

One thing those foods have in common is a high content of antioxidant plant compounds cal...

Millions of Americans live with a common abnormal heart rhythm known as atrial fibrillation (a-fib), but new research suggests that exercise might ease the severity of the condition.

When folks with a-fib participated in a six-month exercise program, they were able to maintain a normal heart rhythm and had less severe symptoms than those who only received information about the benefits of...

Jade Ahankoob loved wrestling.

As a teenager, she devoted herself to the sport. Her diligence helped her win state championships in high school. She became a two-time All-American in high school, then earned the accolade again as a college freshman.

Her passion, however, became too all-consuming. She left the team her sophomore year to focus on school.

She kept working out to ...

The arteries of young people who drink stiffen sooner in their lives, which could increase their risk for heart disease and stroke later on, a British study reports.

People's arteries naturally become less elastic with age, but certain factors -- including alcohol and tobacco use -- can speed up the process. This study included more than 1,600 people in the United Kingdom. Their alcohol u...

Unemployed because of the COVID-19 pandemic and with no place to live, Jeff Sari found refuge at a community organization in Seattle that offered more than just a bed and hot meals.

Chief Seattle Club, a nonprofit focused on supporting American Indian and Alaska Native people, was there for Sari after he was diagnosed with colon cancer in November. The staff made sure he arrived at his do...

As Mark Davis slowly woke up, he shuddered over the terrible dream he'd just experienced. In it, he had no feeling in his right side and each breathe was a struggle.

He was relieved to leave it behind as he thought about getting up and going to work.

Except, he couldn't move.

It wasn't a dream. He was in a hospital bed with a breathing tube down his throat.

His wife, Lis...

Understanding your risk of heart disease can be as cutting-edge as the latest advances in genetic science -- or as down-to-earth as a conversation with grandma. For inherited heart disease specialists, those factors overlap.

Families can share a risk for several forms of heart disease, said Dr. Euan Ashley, director of the Stanford Center for Inherited Cardiovascular Disease in California...

Linda and Clint Pilkinton had a healthy toddler when Linda got pregnant with their second child. They were eager to give Charlie a baby brother.

The first trimester of her pregnancy proceeded much like it did with Charlie. Then came the standard 16-week ultrasound and another chance for Linda and Clint to peek at their son.

The doctor moved the wand across Linda's belly, then grew q...

Long stints on the night shift could set you up for the dangerous heart rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation (a-fib), new research suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data on more than 283,000 people in the UK Biobank database, and found that those who worked night shifts on a usual or permanent basis had a 12% higher risk of a-fib than those who only worked during ...

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