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A cluster of conditions called metabolic syndrome that could lead to heart disease and stroke is becoming more common among Hispanic adults, and experts say there needs to be more research and more work in prevention.

Overall, metabolic syndrome affects about 1 in 3 adults in the United States and puts them at higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and stroke, according to statistics fr...

A test that measures blood flow changes in the brain shows people with high blood pressure are more likely to experience poorer communication between brain regions than those with normal blood pressure, according to a small study.

The research, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, also found those with changes in brain connectivity experienced minor p...

Young women are more likely than their male peers to have a stroke, a new study suggests.

Researchers analyzed a claims database of insured people in the United States from 2001 to 2014, tallying the number of ischemic, or clot-caused, strokes based on hospital admissions. People with a history of stroke or other cerebrovascular disease were not included in the study.

The data s...

On most Fridays, Angela Crenshaw worked from home.

But the day before, Crenshaw had joined colleagues on a work outing to a horse racetrack to celebrate their manager's 10-year anniversary on the job. She'd even squeezed in a session of hot yoga afterward.

So, to catch up on things, she headed into the office that Friday, making the one-hour trip to her job in the employee relat...

Timely rehabilitation is crucial for stroke survivors, but some may not be receiving it due to the coronavirus pandemic, experts say.

Rehabilitation can help the 795,000 stroke survivors in the United States achieve the best possible recovery, according to the American Stroke Association (ASA).

That's why it's critical to begin rehabilitation within three months of a stroke,...

Cholesterol can be confusing. But understanding it could help you live a longer, healthier life.

So in honor of Cholesterol Education Month, we asked a pair of experts to clear up five common questions.

Do my blood cholesterol numbers matter?

"The answer is yes," said Dr. Neil Stone, Bonow Professor in Medicine-Cardiology at Northwestern Universi...

America's air would become remarkably cleaner if the country accelerated its transition to electric cars that don't rely on fossil fuels, the American Lung Association said in a new report Tuesday.

A full transition to electric cars by 2040 would also result in fewer deaths, asthma attacks, heart attacks, strokes and other health problems related to air pollution, said William Barrett...

Growing up in Colima, Mexico, Lorena Melendez-Chavez remembers there was always nourishing food on the table – beans, rice, legumes, tortillas, cheese, vegetables and fruits – despite her family not having financial resources to spare. Her mother, who grew up on a small farm, also insisted her four children exercise because it was just as important to burn off energy as to eat well....

If you have experienced a heart attack and you have an adversarial personality, new research suggests you might want to consider an attitude adjustment.

An angry outlook may make you vulnerable to a second heart attack, the new study found.

The study included more than 2,300 heart attack survivors, average age 67, who were followed for 24 months. Men accounted for 68% of...

Black adults with hard-to-treat high blood pressure often don't get the right medications or receive counseling about the use of healthy behaviors to lower blood pressure, according to a new study.

Past research shows blood pressure is more difficult to control in Black adults than in white adults, and that an estimated 400,000 strokes, heart attacks and other cardiovascular events amon...

Jules Heningburg was sprinting up hills and playing pick-up basketball about a month after being diagnosed with COVID-19.

He was asymptomatic and not contagious. After quarantining and following proper health guidelines, the Premier Lacrosse League player felt fit and ready to return to the field.

His season ended before it began. The 24-year-old Redwoods LC star left the league...

People with fatter legs appear less likely to have high blood pressure, new research suggests.

The researchers suspect that measuring leg fat could help guide blood pressure prevention efforts. Those with bigger legs may not need to worry as much about high blood pressure -- a contributor to heart attack and stroke.

"Distribution of fat matters. Even though we think that f...

Like ordering a ride or food delivery on your smartphone, keeping track of your heart rate, blood pressure or weight is just a few taps away thanks to thousands of free or inexpensive health apps.

But with each click, you may be unwittingly handing over your health data to a third party.

As health apps skyrocket in popularity, experts and medical organizations have begun warning...

With unemployment rates hovering at or near double digits, millions of people are at risk for eviction or foreclosure. And a growing body of research suggests the effects go beyond financial, taking a toll on both physical and mental health.

The CARES Act passed in late March included a moratorium on some evictions and an additional $600 per week in unemployment benefits. But those fede...

There's no resilience gene to help us deal with adversity. Experts say it's a skill to foster, a muscle to pump up.

Six months into the twin calamities of a pandemic and a tough economy, this may be a good time for a resilience workout.

Resilience is the ability to withstand, bounce back and grow in the face of stressors and changing demands. "For a long time, peopl...

Starting drug treatment early in rheumatoid arthritis patients may reduce their risk of heart disease, a new study suggests.

Rheumatoid arthritis at least doubles the risk of heart disease due to its links with atherosclerosis (plaque buildup in the arteries), heart failure and stroke.

The new U.K. study found a link between early rheumatoid arthritis treatment and improveme...

A type of cancer treatment used to boost the body's immune system may worsen inflammation in the arteries that distribute blood from the heart, according to a small study.

The research, published Sept. 8 in the American Heart Association (AHA) journal Circulation, found increased inflammation in the large arteries of 20 Austrians with melanoma immediately following treatment wi...

Like many first-time moms, Stephanie Tawata was anxiously navigating the ups and downs of a newborn.

She was grateful that her son, Jase, slept a lot, but he was tiny and slow to gain weight. At times, he seemed to breathe rapidly. Jase was born a month premature, but doctors had given him a clean bill of health, so she tried not to worry.

But at Jase's 2-month well-baby che...

Long-term heart and lung damage can occur in COVID-19 patients, but it may ease with time, according to a new study.

A second study found that COVID-19 patients recover faster if they begin rehabilitation as soon as possible after getting off a respirator or leaving intensive care.

"The bad news is that people show lung impairment from COVID-19 weeks after discharge; the goo...

Feeling hot, nauseous and in pain after snow skiing in Missouri with her family, 40-year-old Kelly Kleiner tried getting some relief in a restroom at the lodge.

Minutes later, her youngest daughter found Kelly on the floor in the far stall, stripping off layers of clothing in hopes of cooling down.

"Time kind of stood still," Kelly said.

It all started when Kelly tried t...

A growing number of studies suggest many COVID-19 survivors experience some type of heart damage, even if they didn't have underlying heart disease and weren't sick enough to be hospitalized. This latest twist has health care experts worried about a potential increase in heart failure.

"Very early into the pandemic, it was clear that many patients who were hospitalized were showing evid...

There's more bad news about electronic cigarettes: Researchers have identified previously unknown toxins that can affect the heart and lungs of those who vape.

The chemicals form when manufacturers combine flavorings with solvents in e-cigarettes, according to the study. These chemicals can irritate the airways and trigger reactions that result in breathing, heart and blood vessel pro...

When schools close to protect families from the coronavirus, the main worry for many parents might be the lost learning. But for students who end up staying indoors and staring at phones and monitors most of the day, there could be health costs, too.

"You have to give the parents some grace and say we're all sort of in survival mode right now," said Hildi Nicksic, a clinical assistant p...

Could a smartwatch app save a heart attack patient's life? Quite possibly, according to Italian researchers.

They found that electrocardiograph (EKG) readings from a smartwatch were nearly as accurate as standard EKGs among patients with suspected heart attacks.

"A [standard] electrocardiograph is not always readily available," said study author Dr. Ciro Indolfi. "[So] the a...

Labor Day weekend is synonymous with picnics and barbecues, and because of the COVID-19 pandemic, small outdoor gatherings are more popular than ever. However, food that sits out too long or is improperly prepared can lead to trouble.

The good news is, that can be avoided by following a few simple steps.

Penny Kris-Etherton, a distinguished professor of nutrition at Pennsylvania...

Some people with advanced heart failure live for a long time, while others don't. That uncertain timeline poses challenges for doctors, their patients and families dealing with end-of-life care.

"We've had quality indicators for cancer for many years, which have been used to make sure that end-of-life patients get high-quality care," said Dr. Rebecca Hutchinson, a hospice and palliative...

Telemedicine might help people with stubbornly high blood pressure get their numbers down -- and possibly lower their risk of heart disease and stroke in the long run, a new study suggests.

Doctors already recommend that people with high blood pressure use a home monitor to track their numbers. But research suggests that home readings, alone, only make a small difference in getting th...

For some parents and schools, education amid a pandemic will mean a focus on reading, writing and arithmetic. But brain experts say don't forget the singing, dancing and painting.

Arts education often is seen as a frill. But research shows it boosts educational performance. Exposure to the arts can have direct and indirect benefits to mental and physical health. Far from being a luxu...

"Something's not right," Marranda Edwards told her aunt in San Antonio. "I'm coming there."

Edwards, who lives outside of Atlanta, had been worried for several days. Her mother, Alvis Whitlow, hadn't been calling as often as usual, which could easily be five times a day. And when they did speak, Whitlow sounded confused and weak.

In late March, a call from Edwards' aunt adde...

People with the heart-rhythm disorder known as atrial fibrillation, or a-fib, may ease their symptoms with the help of a slower-paced yoga, a preliminary study finds.

Researchers from India found that over 16 weeks of yoga sessions, a-fib patients saw their symptom episodes drop by about half. Their mental well-being got a boost as well.

The findings, which were presented th...

A frequent need to nap could be a red flag for future heart problems and a higher risk of early death, a new analysis concludes.

Long naps lasting more than an hour are associated with a 34% elevated risk of heart disease and a 30% greater risk of death, according to the combined results of 20 previous studies.

Overall, naps of any length were associated with a 19...

While vacationing at a waterpark with his wife, Leah, and their three young children, Shon Hart had what can only be described as an epiphany.

"My kids had their mother and father there with them to experience these moments," Hart said. "I realized how blessed they are to not know the plight of many other children who are growing up without their dads. It was a powerful, surreal moment....

Nearly six months into the COVID-19 pandemic, two things have become clear: The virus profoundly impacts people with heart disease and disproportionately impacts Black people. But the many manifestations of these disparities remain unclear, particularly for one group regularly left out of medical research.

"African American women are often at the intersection of the worst economic and...

Smokers with the most common type of heart rhythm disorder can reduce their risk of stroke and death by giving up cigarettes, a new study says.

"Smoking precipitates blood clots that could lead to a stroke, which may be why giving up lowers risk," said study author So-Ryoung Lee of Seoul National University Hospital in South Korea.

But even former smokers had higher odds for...

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a new U.S. study serves as a reminder of how severe the seasonal flu can be.

Researchers found that among 90,000 Americans hospitalized with the flu, 12% had a serious heart complication, including heart attack and sudden heart failure. Many ended up in the intensive care unit, and 7% died in the hospital.

The study shows that COVID-19 isn...

Nearly 6 in 10 people who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest sought medical help in the previous two weeks, a new study finds.

Cardiac arrest is fatal within minutes if untreated, and less than 10% of victims survive.

"The high mortality from cardiac arrest in the community emphasizes the need to identify those at risk," said study author Dr. Nertila Zylyftari, ...

Pregnant women with preeclampsia are far more likely to develop heart failure later in life than those who don't have blood pressure-related pregnancy complications, especially if it occurs during more than one pregnancy, new research finds.

The study of more than half a million Norwegian women, published Monday in American Heart Association journal Hypertension, found those who develop...

If you suffer from heart failure, try to stay calm. Stress and anger may make your condition worse, a new study suggests.

Mental stress is common in heart failure patients due to the complexities of managing the disease, progressively worsening function, and frequent medical issues and hospitalizations, according to lead author Kristie Harris, a postdoctoral associate in cardiovascul...

Eric Olsen's energy was lacking. His mother thought he sounded tired on the phone. A work colleague noticed he didn't seem like himself.

Then he found himself doubled over in his kitchen, gripping the counter with pounding pain in his chest.

Eric blamed this "horrible heartburn" on his stressful life as a television news director. Even in normal times, a newsroom is a hectic pla...

People with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and depression have worse recovery than those who aren't depressed, a new study finds.

That's especially true for women, the researchers said.

"This is the first study to document how depressive symptoms may complicate PAD recovery even among patients receiving specialty care," said senior author Kim Smolderen. She's co-director...

After nearly a decade of steady decline, the death rate for people with blood clots in the lungs reversed course and began rising over the past decade, new research finds.

The study, published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, found death rates for pulmonary embolism (PE) dropped an average of 4.4% per year from 1999 to 2008, then began climbing an average of ...

With forecasts showing an "extremely active" hurricane season and the entire country under varying degrees of grappling with physical distancing and fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic, planning and preparation will be key, experts say.

Our hospital systems are already stressed taking care of COVID patients, so our capacity to take care of others is diminished," said Dr. M. Tyson Pillow, t...

Packed with nutrients and easy to eat, either as a sandwich spread or as a dip, nut butters can be a simple solution for school lunches, snacks and beyond.

And their growing popularity seems to be matched only by the number of varieties available. Gone are the days when peanut butter was the only choice for someone craving a chewy, nutty spread. Today, it's just as easy to find deliciou...

Stroke is more deadly among Black people than whites, and the reason may come down to genetics.

Researchers who studied the genomes of more than 21,000 Black people found that a common variation near the HNF1A gene was tied to an increased risk of stroke in people of African descent.

The gene has been linked to stroke and heart disease.

"Given the undue burden t...

Because of her last name, Donulaé Knuckles has long answered to "Nurse Knuckles." Yet the grit and determination the name conjures fits, too.

Raised by a single mom in Detroit, she prioritized her education. Regularly studying deep into the evening, she graduated near the top of her high school class. She earned a full scholarship to the University of Michigan, where she earned a...

Most people probably think of school as something for strengthening the brain. Increasingly, researchers are learning that it may be just as important for the heart.

Education is an excellent predictor of heart disease, multiple studies have shown. Dr. Arshed A. Quyyumi, director of the Emory Clinical Cardiovascular Research Institute in Atlanta, said although having fewer years of scho...

A growing number of older people are turning to the vitamin biotin to fortify their aging skin, hair and nails.

But a new study shows how large doses of it can interfere with some vital medical tests.

Biotin, or vitamin B7, is an essential nutrient. And there is no issue with the lower doses found in multivitamins, said study author Danni Li, an associate professor of labora...

Black people with severely malfunctioning heart valves are less likely than their white peers to receive lifesaving valve replacements, according to a new study.

The study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Heart Association, looked at the treatment rates by race for aortic valve stenosis, a condition when the valve doesn't open and close properly and may leak blood.

...

Black and Hispanic Americans are much more likely than white people to avoid going to the hospital for heart attack or stroke symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic, an online survey reveals.

More than half (55%) of Hispanics, 45% of Black people and 40% of white people said they'd be scared to go to the hospital if they thought they were having a heart attack or stroke, be...

In the months since COVID-19 emerged, medical experts have learned a lot about the threat it poses to people with issues such as high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity or cardiovascular disease.

But much of the essential advice remains the same: Take the coronavirus seriously. Do all you can to avoid catching it. And never ignore symptoms of a heart attack, stroke or other condition tha...

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