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Results for search "Heart / Stroke-Related: Coronary-Artery Disease".

09 Jul

Fried Food and Heart Health

Eating fried food even once per week can up your risk of heart disease.

Health News Results - 125

Since the 1970s, serious heart disease among childhood cancer survivors had declined remarkably, a new study finds.

The decline suggests that efforts to make cancer treatments, including radiation, less toxic are paying off, researchers say.

For the study, researchers led by Dr. Daniel Mulrooney, from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., collected data ...

Popular media often portrays heart disease as a man's problem, but new research suggests that women's blood vessels actually age faster than men's do.

The new study found that blood pressure started increasing in women as early as the third decade of life, and it continued to rise higher than blood pressure in men throughout the life span.

The researchers said that this...

Heart disease may increase your odds for kidney failure, a new study finds.

"Individuals with a history of cardiovascular disease should be recognized as a high-risk population for kidney failure," said study leader Dr. Junichi Ishigami, of Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

"Physicians should be aware of cardiovascular disease as an important ris...

Your New Year's resolution to run a marathon for the first time could be your ticket to a younger and healthier heart, a new study suggests.

First-time marathon runners experience health benefits that essentially turn back time on their circulatory system, researchers report.

"Training for a marathon -- even as a novice runner -- has significant benefits on the cardiovascula...

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Friday gave expanded approval to a prescription form of fish oil called Vascepa, to help prevent heart trouble in people at high risk who are already taking statins.

Vascepa (icosapent ethyl) was already FDA-approved for a small percentage of patients with exceptionally high blood levels of triglycerides, a type of blood fat.

The new ...

Secondhand smoke can harm children's arteries, a new study warns.

Researchers used ultrasound to examine the carotid artery in the neck, brachial artery in the upper arm, and abdominal aorta right above the belly button in 298 kids aged 8 to 18 who were not smokers.

Some had been exposed to secondhand smoke and others had not, the study authors said.

The investiga...

Though weight-loss surgery can do wonders for your waistline, a new study suggests it might also reverse subtle damage to your heart.

The research included 38 obese patients who had weight-loss surgery and 19 obese patients who were on the waiting list for weight-loss surgery.

At the start of the study, 58% of patients in the surgery group had subclinical heart disease -...

Many patients who have an artery-opening procedure don't understand or remember information they receive before their surgery, and most have unrealistic expectations about what it will do for them, a new study finds.

Researchers examined the effectiveness of informed consent -- which is meant to provide the risks and benefits of a procedure -- given to a group of patients before they ...

A doctor armed with your Apple Watch might be able to tell if you're suffering from a heart attack, researchers report.

A physician should be able to gather enough heart rhythm data by placing the watch's sensors on different parts of your body, to judge whether a person is in the middle of a heart attack, the study found.

"Any Apple Watch series 4 and 5 can be used," said r...

Prescription-strength fish oil slows the development of artery-clogging plaques, according to early results from an ongoing clinical trial.

Icosapent ethyl, sold under the brand name Vascepa, is a drug derived from fish that contains pure EPA, a key nutrient in fish oil. In the new study, Vascepa appeared to put the brakes on key aspects of plaque formation in vessels after nine month...

Diabetes might be more deadly for women than men, at least when it comes to heart troubles, new research shows.

Heart disease occurs an average of 15 years earlier in people with diabetes, and is their main cause of illness and death. In women, the connection between diabetes and heart disease is particularly strong.

Worldwide, more women die due to diabetes than men, 2.1 mi...

It seems like a no brainer: The flu shot protects heart patients from illness and death, so getting one should be the first thing they do every year before the season starts.

But new research shows that a third of these vulnerable patients don't get vaccinated.

"Patients need to be educated about the benefits of the flu vaccination," said study lead author Dr. Gowtham Grand...

When children with genetically high cholesterol are prescribed statins, it can drastically cut their risk of heart disease and death before the age of 40, a new study finds.

At issue is a condition called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), an inherited genetic disorder that causes levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol to soar. It begins at birth, and people with FH have a high risk of deve...

Chemotherapy can be hard on the heart, but an individualized exercise program may mitigate some of that damage, new research suggests.

Heart problems are a common side effect in patients with cancer because cancer treatments can impair heart function and structure or accelerate development of heart disease, especially when patients have risk factors such as high blood pressure, accor...

Scientists are taking the wrappings off an age-old malady.

Clogged arteries are a heart problem that's dogged humanity for millennia, finds a new imaging study of mummies.

Mummified arterial tissue shows evidence of cholesterol plaque buildup in people who lived anywhere from 2000 BC to 1000 AD, said lead researcher Dr. Mohammad Madjid.

These weren't just bigwigs ...

If you are older and you have heart disease, you might think you should take it easy. But new research suggests the opposite is true.

Exercise is especially beneficial for patients who have a physical impairment, the study authors found.

"Aging is associated with several factors such as increased inflammation or oxidative stress that predispose people to cardiovascular disea...

A new study proves that the old adage "use it or lose it" is definitely true when it comes to fitness.

After just two weeks of sedentary behavior, formerly fit people had:

  • A decline in heart and lung health
  • Increased waist circumference
  • Greater body fat and liver fat
  • Higher levels of insulin resistance

"The study showed th...

Scientists may have found a way that obesity directly damages the arteries and contributes to heart disease -- a discovery that they say could eventually lead to new treatments.

The British researchers found that in heart disease patients who are obese, body fat surrounding the arteries tends to secrete high amounts of a protein called WNT5A. The protein, in turn, appears to have "tox...

Could popping just one pill a day keep your heart and blood vessels humming along for years to come?

Possibly. Researchers just tested a combo pill containing low doses of two blood pressure medications, a statin and a medication that keeps you from retaining excess fluid. They estimated that taking the polypill over a year reduced the risk of heart disease and blood vessel disease b...

Heart attack patients often take longer to seek help if they have gradual symptoms, which may put them at increased risk of death, researchers say.

Gradual symptoms begin with mild discomfort that slowly worsens, while abrupt symptoms are sudden and severe pain, according to authors of a study published Sept. 12 in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.

"Both...

Small, lasting changes in cholesterol and blood pressure levels can dramatically reduce the risk of heart disease and strokes over a lifetime, new research suggests.

The large study found that a combination of a drop in LDL cholesterol (the bad type) of 14 mg/dL and a 5 mm Hg drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure reading) cut the lifetime risk of heart di...

As Hurricane Dorian rolls up the southeastern coast of the United States, most in its path worry about having enough water, food and batteries to ride the storm out.

But the American Heart Association (AHA) warns that the high stress and trauma of such an event can also trigger heart trouble, especially among heart disease and stroke patients.

The hurricane is forecast to h...

An unhealthy lifestyle is a bigger contributor to heart disease than genetics for many younger adults, according to a new study.

The findings show that good health habits should be a key part of prevention efforts, even in people with a family history of early heart disease, researchers said.

The study included 1,075 people under age 50. Of those,...

Opening all of a person's clogged arteries after a heart attack can protect their health better than reopening only the one that caused it, a major international clinical trial has concluded.

Opening all blockages and not just the "culprit" behind the attack reduces a patient's risk of dying or having another heart attack by 26%, researchers reported Se...

Rising obesity rates, coupled with an associated jump in diabetes and high blood pressure cases, appears to be undoing decades of gains made against heart disease, a new study finds.

After 2010, the rate of deaths from heart disease continued to drop, but more slowly. Deaths from stroke leveled off, and deaths from high blood pressure ("hypertension") increased, researchers report.

The treatments that childhood cancer patients receive often save their lives, but they also make survivors prone to heart troubles, a new study finds.

For the study, researchers examined heart disease rates in nearly 7,300 childhood cancer survivors (diagnosed at an average age of 7) and a "control group" of more than 36,000 people without cancer in the province of Ontario, Canada.

Imagine a single pill loaded with a battery of heart medications that you take once a day to cut your chances of heart attack, stroke and heart failure.

A new clinical trial has turned that idea into reality.

The "polypill" reduced the risk of life-threatening heart health problems by more than one-third during a five-year period in a group of more than 3,400 people aged 50 ...

Add another health risk to the use of e-cigarettes: New research shows that vaping instantly stiffens and tightens your blood vessels.

The small study of healthy young adults discovered that even e-cigarettes without nicotine caused a short-lived drop in blood vessel function.

The long-term consequences of that are unclear. But researchers said the findings add to evi...

Pile those vegetables and fruits high when you sit down to eat, and your heart will thank you.

A diet rich in plant-based foods translated into fewer heart problems in a new study.

For the study, the researchers analyzed data collected from more than 10,000 middle-aged U.S. adults who were followed from 1987 through 2016. None had heart disease at the start of that period.<...

Cigarette smokers have a sharply higher risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD) -- and even if they quit, that added risk can last for decades, a new study warns.

PAD narrows arteries in the leg, leading to reduced blood flow that causes pain, poor wound healing and other symptoms.

The study also showed that smoking increases the odds of developing PAD more than it raises th...

Heart attacks, strokes and other heart problems are more likely in high-risk patients denied access to cutting-edge cholesterol-busting drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors, a new study reports.

Patients are 16% more likely to have a heart-related health crisis if their PCSK9 prescription is rejected than if it is covered and filled for a year, according to researchers.

Patients wh...

It can look like a less strenuous sport than football or soccer, but professional baseball players might be the healthiest athletes out there, a new study finds.

Athletes in Major League Baseball (MLB) tend to live about 24% longer than the average American guy, according to a century's worth of mortality rates among nearly 10,500 pro baseball players.

What's more, baseb...

If you trim out only 300 calories a day -- the equivalent of six Oreo cookies -- that could be all it takes to cut diabetes and heart disease risk, new research suggests.

In the study, just over 200 adults younger than 50 with a healthy weight or just a few extra pounds were told to reduce their calorie intake by 25% for two years. Their ability to achieve that goal varied, and th...

Watching your cholesterol intake has gotten easier.

Nutrition experts now agree that certain foods high in cholesterol, like shrimp and eggs, don't have the impact on your blood cholesterol that was once thought. Even better, some foods can help lower your blood cholesterol level.

Walnuts have healthy unsaturated fats that help lower LDL -- that's the unhealthy type of chol...

If you're an older woman, your heart disease risk might be shaped by the shape of your body.

Researchers report that if you look more like an apple than a pear, your chances of heart trouble are heightened, even if you are a normal weight.

Interestingly, women who carried their weight in their legs had a significantly lower risk of cardiovascular disease, the study a...

New research offers a compelling case for staying in school: American adults who spent more time in the classroom as kids have a lower risk of heart disease.

"As a society, we should be thinking about investing in social policies to improve overall health and reduce health care costs," said study author Dr. Rita Hamad. She's an assistant professor of family and community medicine at ...

Green tea is a popular health trend, with many people sipping it in hopes of deriving benefits from the brew.

There's nothing wrong with that, dietitians say -- green tea is a healthy drink loaded with antioxidants. But the jury's still out on many of its purported health benefits.

"Clinical trials related to green tea are still in their early stages," said Nancy Farrell All...

Postmenopausal women who survive breast cancer may have a higher risk for developing heart disease, a new study says.

Heart problems can appear more than five years after radiation treatment for breast cancer, and the added risk persists for as much as 30 years, according to Brazilian researchers.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in older women.

"Heart d...

New research supports the notion that Obamacare has improved the health of Americans: State expansions in Medicaid appear to have cut the number of deaths from heart disease.

Counties in states with expanded Medicaid experienced an average of four fewer deaths from heart disease per 100,000 people than states that didn't accept the expansion under the Affordable Care Act.

In...

Coffee lovers can take comfort in a new finding that shows their caffeine habit won't hurt their arteries.

In fact, British researchers said drinking a lot of coffee -- even up to 25 cups a day -- doesn't appear to make your arteries stiff.

The investigators noted that reports on coffee have been conflicting and confusing, and they hope their study will put these rep...

People who get many of their meals from packages may have heightened risks of heart disease, stroke and premature death, two large studies suggest.

The findings, published online May 29 in the journal BMJ, are the latest to point the finger at "ultra-processed" foods.

They include not only "junk food" -- like chips, sweets and fast food -- but also the breads, process...

In yet another sign that electronic cigarettes are far from harmless, a new lab study suggests that vaping damages the cells that line the inside walls of blood vessels and could hasten heart trouble.

Lab-grown endothelial cells were more likely to die off or suffer from impaired function when exposed to e-cigarette vapor, the researchers reported.

If this same effect occur...

More than 1 million Americans have a genetic condition that pushes their cholesterol to dangerously high levels, but many don't know it.

Now, researchers offer a possible way to get more people with so-called familial hypercholesterolemia into treatment for this potentially life-threatening problem.

"The blood donor system could be a portal to understand who has genetic chol...

Despite an epidemic of childhood obesity, the cholesterol levels of American kids have been improving over the past 20 years, a new study shows.

Researchers found that since 1999, levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol among U.S. children and teens have declined, while levels of "good" HDL cholesterol have risen.

That's the good news, researchers report in the May 21 issue of the <...

TUESDAY, May 14, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Glucosamine has long been used as a supplement to help ease the joint pain of arthritis, but new research suggests its anti-inflammatory properties might also lower heart disease risk.

The finding stems from a lifestyle survey involving more than 466,000 British men and women. None had been diagnosed with heart disease when they were first po...

Let's say you're one of the millions of older adults who takes a low-dose aspirin religiously, in the belief that it will guard against heart disease and heart attacks.

Now, a new review suggests your risk of a brain bleed outweighs any heart benefit that a daily aspirin might bring you.

Researchers said the findings support a recent change to guidelines on low-dose aspirin:...

Cancer treatments save lives, but they can also compromise the heart in the long run. Now, new research shows that many U.S. cardiologists aren't trained to treat this unique group of patients.

Heart disease and cancer are the two main causes of death in the United States, but advances in early detection and treatment of cancer have resulted in rising numbers of cancer survivors. By 2...

Tighter high blood pressure guidelines for children might better spot those at risk for heart disease in adulthood, a new study suggests.

Compared to 2004 guidelines, the updated 2017 guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics increased the number of children considered to have high blood pressure.

But it wasn't known if the new guidelines would help predict children...

Your heart will thank you if you replace red meat with healthy plant proteins.

Doing so will lower your odds for heart disease, according to a new study.

Researchers analyzed data from 36 trials involving more than 1,800 people to learn how different diets affected heart disease risk factors such as blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and lipoproteins.

They ...

Where your resting heart rate goes, so goes your health.

That's the suggestion of a new study that found older Swedish men with a resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute had a doubled risk of an early death, even though that rate is well within the normal range of 50 to 100 beats per minute.

That increase in risk held for both death from any cause and death linked to heart...

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