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Results for search "Exercise: Football".

16 Oct

High School Concussion Trends

Concussions during H.S. football games still on the rise, but the news isn't all bad.

12 Aug

Dangers of Football Conditioning

"Irrationally intense" conditioning sessions may be causing more football fatalities, study finds

22 Feb

Football And Head Trauma

Football players who only play the game in HS still at risk for CTE.

Health News Results - 42

You're not likely to find any studies linking heart disease and NFL coaches – just a long list of familiar names.

Among them: Mike Ditka of the Chicago Bears, who had heart attacks in 1988 and 2018. Bill Parcells of the New York Giants and other teams, who needed bypass surgery in 1992. Dennis Green of the Minnesota Vikings and Arizona Cardinals, who died of complications of ca...

Jon Dorenbos was swimming with sharks in Bora Bora when he realized he kept losing his breath. During his 14-year NFL career, he'd never experienced anything like this.

"It felt like I would drown," Jon said.

A month later, in August 2017, Jon was traded from the Philadelphia Eagles to the New Orleans Saints. During a physical required to seal the deal, the physician heard...

New research on concussions reports mixed news for kids playing high school sports.

The good news? Concussions are down during football practices. And the number of recurrent concussions is down in all sports.

The bad news? Concussions are on the rise during high school football games, and football continues to have the highest concussion rates in high school sports.

...

The more years football players play the game, the higher their odds of developing the degenerative brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a new study finds.

Adding to the growing evidence of the link between football and CTE, samples from the brains of dead pro and amateur players showed the risk for CTE went up with playing time.

"While we don't yet...

Former NFL star Tedy Bruschi spent the last 14 years showing what a stroke survivor could do: continue playing pro football, climb Mount Kilimanjaro, run the Boston Marathon.

Now Bruschi is showing what a two-time stroke survivor can do.

Bruschi had his second stroke on July 4. Since then he's run a 7-mile road race, and every Sunday during the NFL season he'll appear on E...

Tim Tyrrell talks about football like a man who loved every minute of his six years in the NFL. He relishes stories of the devastating hits he leveled. He's proud of the way he could get knocked out, shake it off and get right back into the game. He loved the "ridiculous" intensity of two-a-day practices, the steak-and-egg breakfasts before games, and more.

He's 58 and says his healt...

Pro football players who had long careers at key positions are more likely to have concussion-related problems such as confusion, memory loss, depression and anxiety, a new study finds.

In a survey of nearly 3,500 former NFL players (average age 53), 1 in 8 (12%) reported serious cognitive problems. That compares to about 2% of the general U.S. population.

Age didn't...

Low testosterone is not something most people typically associate with NFL players.

But repeated concussions from professional football appear to be damaging the sex life of players, causing erectile dysfunction and lowering their levels of the male hormone, a new study claims.

"The guys at the highest level of concussion were almost twice as likely to report erectile dysfu...

The length of time that NFL players are sidelined after a concussion has tripled in the past two decades, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed data from the 2012-2015 pro football seasons. They found that the players who suffered a concussion returned to play an average of 19 days later, which means they missed about 1.5 games.

Data collected between 1996 and 2001 showed ...

It is an annual rite of summer: sending young men out on football fields across America in the sweltering August heat for grueling practice sessions designed to prepare them for the coming season.

But a new study shows the ritual can be costly if players are pushed too hard. It is the most common way players die of non-traumatic injuries in high school and college football.

...

Concussions are bad news for the brain, but what about the less damaging hits to the head that are the nuts and bolts of contact sports? Do they also pose a threat?

The brain scans of 38 college football players suggest the answer is yes.

Over the course of a single season, the players collectively absorbed almost 20,000 hits. Only two of those were actually concussions. Yet...

Just how dangerous is American football?

Pretty dangerous, a new analysis claims.

Repeated exposure to head trauma during play often causes significant brain damage, researchers report. That damage then gives rise to neurological disease, which then boosts the risk for dementia by the time players reach middle-age and beyond.

The conclusion follows autopsies perfor...

Could the rugby way of tackling lower the risk of concussions in American football?

A new study claims it could, by reducing the force of head impacts.

"For athletes who participate in a sport that involves a tackle or direct contact, adapting a rugby-style tackle where the players lead with their shoulders, not their heads, could make college sports safer," said study autho...

Former pro football players typically have healthier hearts than the average Joe -- except when it comes to a type of heart rhythm disturbance, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that former NFL players had a nearly six times higher rate of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), versus other men their age. The condition was present in 5% of 460 former players, versus 0.5% of nonath...

Brian Duncan doesn't know why his brain still works as well as it does.

Duncan, 67, got his bell rung more than once during his life -- as a professional football player, an amateur boxer and a bull rider at Texas rodeos.

He remembers one time he got slammed into the ground by L.C. Greenwood, a 6-foot, 6-inch defensive end for the Pittsburgh Steelers, so hard that he halluci...

It can look like a less strenuous sport than football or soccer, but professional baseball players might be the healthiest athletes out there, a new study finds.

Athletes in Major League Baseball (MLB) tend to live about 24% longer than the average American guy, according to a century's worth of mortality rates among nearly 10,500 pro baseball players.

What's more, baseb...

Certain high school and college athletes require a longer-than-normal recovery period after a concussion. Researchers say blood tests can predict which ones.

"With so many people sustaining concussions and a sizable number of them having prolonged symptoms and recovery, any tools we can develop to help determine who would be at greater risk of problems would be very beneficial, so the...

It's a classic Catch-22: While kids who play sports are more likely to suffer a concussion, they seem to recover faster if they had already spent a lot of time on the field.

So finds new research that discovered kids who played a sport for at least seven years and had experienced a concussion recovered more quickly than kids with less experience who experienced a concussion. The study...

With concern over concussion dangers rising, most U.S. parents now say that they would support bans on tackling in youth football, a new survey shows.

Researchers found that of more than 1,000 parents in a national sample, 60 percent were in favor of age restrictions on tackling. Another quarter were in the "maybe" camp.

The study, published online April 1 in the journal

After-school activities help develop social skills and talent, but a new report finds that many kids are priced out of participating.

In fact, for 1 in 6 middle and high school students, costs are the prime reason for not taking part in these activities. And the poorest students are two times less likely to participate, compared with their better-off peers, researchers reported in a n...

Crippling brain injury from football can start early, even among high school players, a new study suggests.

And its effects can last over time, even without additional head impacts, researchers report.

Football players can develop chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) after playing high school football, although higher rates of CTE are tied to college and pro football, the res...

There's more evidence that football may be changing the brains of adolescent players, and not in a good way.

In a new study, researchers looked at MRI scans of 26 football-playing boys averaging 12 years of age.

Comparing MRIs taken just before the football season and then three months after, the scans revealed that the boys had changes in an important area of the brain cal...

High-impact hits may affect the brain development of children and teens after just one season of football, preliminary research suggests.

The study compared functional MRI scans taken pre- and post-season. The researchers saw more gray matter volume in those who had high-impact hits -- but no concussions -- over the season.

More gray matter indicates that the brain might ...

The long-term effects of head injuries in football players begin at a young age, a new study finds.

Researchers tested college football players' blood for concussion markers and found that they had elevated levels of these markers before the season even started.

"It was quite shocking to learn that the biomarkers were high before they were even involved in one hit or tackle ...

Athletes may be less likely to suffer concussions if they carry a gene linked to the learning disorder dyslexia, a new study suggests.

Researchers looked at the concussion history of 87 football players at Penn State University. They also checked the players for certain genes.

The findings suggest that "genotype may play a role in your susceptibility for getting a concussion...

Repeated hits to the head, rather than one severe blow, may determine whether football players suffer a concussion, a new study suggests.

The findings underscore the need to limit head impacts during football practice and games, said study lead author Brian Stemper, of Marquette University and Medical College of Wisconsin.

Stemper's team compared 50 Division 1 college footba...

Young football players who suffer repeated head blows -- but not concussions -- may not sustain brain damage, a new study suggests.

For the study, researchers followed 112 football players, aged 9 to 18, during the 2016 season.

"We expected repetitive impacts to correlate with worsening neurocognitive [brain] function, but we found that sub-concussive head impacts sustained...

The most dangerous play in football can be rendered safer through a simple rule change, a new study out of the Ivy League suggests.

Moving the kickoff line forward by just five yards -- from the 35- to the 40-yard line -- reduced the average annual concussion rate in Ivy League football by more than 68 percent, the study revealed.

That change makes players less likely to run...

Young athletes specializing in one sport may hope it's a ticket to an athletic scholarship in college, but a new analysis suggests the practice might also doom them to overuse injuries.

Pulling data from five prior studies, scientists found that athletes aged 18 and younger who concentrated on a single sport were nearly two times more likely to sustain an overuse injury from repeated...

Student athletes who specialize in one sport year-round could lose out in academics and other fields, a new study finds.

"Today's students have so many responsibilities and when you add specializing in a sport -- with participation in school and club teams, practices, tournaments and lots of travel -- there just aren't enough hours in the day to finish their schoolwork, spend time with ...

More than half of American parents say they've considered keeping their children out of sports over concerns about injuries, a new survey finds.

Still, the poll of more than 1,000 parents found that nearly 60 percent said their kids had participated in sports, and 9 in 10 believed sports was important to their child's overall wellness, according to the National Athletic Trainers' Asso...

Most states require school athletes to have a sports physical, and now is the time to book it, doctors say.

These physicals can reveal health problems that could impair athletic performance or even pose a risk of injury or death, according to Dr. John Higgins. He's a professor of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

"They help us determine th...

There are differences in the brains of athletes who play contact sports and those who play noncontact sports, according to researchers.

But they added that it isn't clear if these differences are caused by blows to the head because the study only showed an association.

The Indiana University investigators scanned the brains of 21 college football players, 19 college cross-co...

While football is frequently blamed for concussions, a new study shows that it's also the sport in which athletes are most likely to suffer neck injuries.

A neck fracture, commonly referred to as a broken neck, is a break in one or more vertebrae in the upper part of the spine. Neck sprains involve injury to the soft tissue surrounding those bones. The neck is referred to medically a...

A lifetime spent playing football has been linked to brain damage, but the game also may lead to serious heart problems, two new studies suggest.

In one, researchers found that former National Football League players have a five-times greater chance of developing heart rhythm problems, such as atrial fibrillation, than the general public.

The other study found structural ch...

Given the news of the devastating effects of head injuries among professional football players, parents may wonder if their mini athletes are at risk, too.

Some very well might be, new research suggests.

About 7 percent of children 3 to 17 years old have experienced a head injury, according to U.S. health officials.

The findings are part of a report on children's ...

The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots playing in Sunday's Super Bowl may have already taken a hidden hit before setting foot on the field, a new study suggests.

The new research says career NFL players have a slightly higher risk of early death than a group of replacement players who stood in for a few games during a short league strike in the 1980s.

The overall d...

Nearly 60 percent of college football players have low levels of vitamin D, a new study suggests.

That means they face a significantly higher risk for muscle strain and injury, the researchers said.

"We were interested in vitamin D in this population because it's been shown to play an important role in muscle function and strength, which is critical to the high-performance a...

A group of former National Football League greats -- including Hall of Famers Harry Carson of the New York Giants and Nick Buoniconti of the Miami Dolphins -- is urging parents not to let their children play tackle football until they're at least 14 years old.

The group is instead endorsing a program called "Flag Football Under 14," launched by the Concussion Legacy Foundation. The p...

Head impacts, not just concussions, may lead to the degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), according to new research.

The findings could lead to early detection and improved treatment and prevention of CTE, the researchers suggest.

More than 100 National Football League players have been posthumously identified as having CTE. They include...

The more college football referees know about concussion symptoms, the more confident they are in calling a timeout for a suspected head injury, a new study shows.

Researchers surveyed more than 1,300 college football officials during the 2015 season and found that they called an average of one injury timeout for a suspected concussion every four games.

Those with greater aw...

Former professional football players are at increased risk for an enlarged aorta, which can lead to a life-threatening bulge in the artery, a new study reports.

The aorta, the largest artery in the body, carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body. The short part of the aorta is called the ascending aorta. It rises from the left ventricle -- the bottom left chamber of the hea...

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