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Health News Results - 16

An artificial pancreas system is safe and effective at managing blood sugar levels in kids as young as age 6 with type 1 diabetes, according to a new study.

The system uses a continuous glucose monitor (CGM) to track blood sugar levels and automatically delivers insulin when needed using an insulin pump. It replaces reliance on fingerstick or CGM with delivery of insulin by injection ...

When something as routine as grocery shopping might lead to a deadly COVID-19 infection, stress is inevitable -- and that extra tension can make it harder for people with diabetes to manage their disease.

The reason? The stress hormone cortisol is linked to higher blood sugar levels, according to a new study.

Under stress, the body releases cortisol, which leads to an inc...

Bodies stressed by severe COVID-19 could produce abnormally high blood sugar levels, even in people without diagnosed diabetes. And that appears tied to a doubling of the odds of dying from COVID-19, Chinese researchers report.

High blood sugar (glucose) levels, measured at the time of admission to the hospital, were also linked to more severe disease and complications, according to r...

Early in the coronavirus pandemic, doctors learned that people with diabetes face a greater risk of developing serious complications from COVID-19 infections.

What they didn't immediately realize is that the new coronavirus might trigger diabetes in people who didn't have the blood sugar disease before.

To get a better idea of exactly how COVID-19 and diabetes interact, an ...

Technology often makes life easier to manage, and new research confirms that's definitely the case for people with type 1 diabetes.

Continuous glucose monitors -- devices that approximate blood sugar levels every few minutes -- can help teens and young adults better manage their diabetes. They can also help older adults prevent dangerously low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia), accor...

Good blood sugar control can help protect against mental decline after a common type of stroke in people with diabetes, new research suggests.

The study included 942 patients with diabetes who suffered a lacunar stroke -- one caused by a blockage in an artery that provides blood to the brain's deep structures.

Better blood sugar (glucose) control was associated with better m...

There's a new, unexpected reason to keep your pearly whites gleaming: avoiding diabetes.

New research found that people who regularly brush their teeth three times a day reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes.

The study also found that people who have dental disease or a lot of missing teeth have a higher risk of developing the blood sugar condition.

"Our study su...

People with what's known as the "metabolic syndrome" are vulnerable to recurring blood clots, new research shows.

Metabolic syndrome is a collection of conditions, including obesity, high blood sugar, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. These factors put people at risk for diabetes, heart disease and a type of blood clot known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), researchers say.

...

Parents of babies with type 1 diabetes have to prick their child's skin multiple times a day to check their blood sugar. But researchers may have developed a much easier way to check -- a sugar-sensing pacifier.

While baby sucks on the pacifier, it collects saliva, tests the sugar (glucose) levels and wirelessly sends results to a receiver that a parent/caregiver can see.

...

The latest version of the so-called artificial pancreas system helped people with type 1 diabetes gain even better control of their blood sugar levels than current technology does, a new study reports.

The device combines an insulin pump, a continuous glucose monitor and a computer algorithm. The system measures blood sugar levels and delivers insulin automatically when levels rise. ...

Type 2 diabetes is a known risk factor for heart disease, and researchers thought that five years of really tight blood sugar control might reduce the risk of heart disease for years to come.

But a new 15-year follow-up study found that was not the case. The findings suggest it might be more important to control other risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure, chole...

Keeping blood pressure and blood sugar levels under control might prevent a common heart rhythm disorder called "heart block."

That's the finding from a new study analyzing data on more than 6,000 people, aged 30 and older, in Finland.

In the study, the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) researchers found that 58 of those people developed heart block over an av...

Fibromyalgia is a mysterious and misunderstood illness, but researchers may have uncovered at least one key to the disease's origin: insulin resistance.

The new research compared a small group of people with fibromyalgia to two groups of healthy people and noted that a long-term measure of blood sugar levels was higher in the people with fibromyalgia. Insulin resistance develops when ...

Test strips help millions monitor their health at home, but people should avoid buying strips that are pre-owned or not approved for sale in the United States.

Using such strips could lead to incorrect test results that could put people at risk for serious problems and even death, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

What are some examples of how these strips are used...

Avoiding food before bedtime probably won't help your blood sugar levels and health, a new study suggests.

Some experts say not eating for two hours before going to bed helps prevent high blood sugar (glucose) levels and related health problems such as diabetes and heart disease. But there is no clear evidence to support this theory.

In search of answers, researchers analyz...

Women with high blood sugar during pregnancy run a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes years after giving birth, a new study finds.

The finding held true whether or not a woman developed actual "gestational diabetes" during pregnancy, the researchers noted.

Babies might also be affected: Children born to these women were more prone to obesity, the study found.

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