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Results for search "Emotional Disorders: Misc.".

Health News Results - 24

Looking for a way to improve your memory, gain control over your emotions, and boost your ability to multitask?

A new brain scan study may be just the incentive you need to put yoga at the top of your New Years' to-do list.

The review of 11 published studies found a link between yoga's movements, meditation and breathing practices and an increase in the size of key brain are...

Parents want the best for their children. Eat well. Get enough sleep. Exercise. But sometimes pressuring your teen to diet or lose weight may end up harming them, a new study suggests.

It found that parents who urge their kids to diet might actually be boosting their odds for obesity later in life. It's also tied to an increased risk for eating disorders.

The phenomenon can ...

Feel bad about feeling bad? Don't.

Studies done at the University of California, Berkeley, have found that acknowledging a blue mood -- and not berating yourself for it -- can help you work through it more easily.

It turns out that accepting negative emotions is better for your long-term mental health than constantly passing judgment on yourself, which can cause your feeling...

If a mother is depressed, her young children might be at risk for hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety, a new study suggests.

Interestingly, a father's depression only affected kids if mom was also depressed, the researchers found.

"Depression among parents both during and after pregnancy not only affects the person suffering from depression but also has a long-term imp...

U.S. politics has been incredibly divisive in recent years, and will likely only grow worse as President Donald Trump faces possible impeachment over the Ukrainian scandal.

So it's no wonder the stress of ugly national politics has started to affect the emotional and physical health of some citizens, as a new study suggests.

Nearly two out of every five Americans say politic...

"Broken heart syndrome" may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests.

While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive their cancer five years after diagnosis.

"There seems to be a st...

Remember the "mood ring" craze of the 1970s?

A high-tech wristband is being developed along the same lines, potentially helping patients who struggle with mood disorders.

The smart wristband would use a person's skin to track their emotional intensity. During a mood swing, either high or low, the wristband would change color, heat up, squeeze or vibrate to inform the wearer ...

Research points to a very long list of benefits from exercise, from improving your overall health to easing stress and enhancing mental well-being. But a landmark study in the journal Circulation highlights a negative, yet specific, concern.

While health factors like obesity and diabetes are known heart attack triggers, data from 12,500 people in 52 countries pointed to two oth...

This dog-eat-dog world got you feeling anxious? If so, your canine companion probably feels the same way, new research shows.

A Swedish research team measured levels of the stress hormone cortisol in hair samples taken from dogs and their owners.

"We found that the levels of long-term cortisol in the dog and its owner were synchronized, such that owners with high cortisol l...

The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it's anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more.

Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and arthritis, the researchers said.

"As most people age, they simply cannot do the activities they once did, or they may experie...

Here's something to make you smile: Turning that frown upside down does make folks feel a little happier, researchers conclude.

While most of us might know this instinctively, academics have not always been sure.

"Conventional wisdom tells us that we can feel a little happier if we simply smile. Or that we can get ourselves in a more serious mood if we scowl," said lead rese...

A sure-fire antidote to the blues is to focus on others, a new study suggests.

"Walking around and offering kindness to others in the world reduces anxiety and increases happiness and feelings of social connection," said study author Douglas Gentile, a professor of psychology at Iowa State University.

"It's a simple strategy that doesn't take a lot of time that you can inco...

Children with autism may have trouble interpreting facial emotions in strangers, but research finds some are as "in-tune" with their mother's expressions as kids without autism.

The study included 4- to 8-year-olds with and without autism who viewed five facial expressions -- happy, sad, angry, fearful and neutral -- on both familiar and unfamiliar faces.

Children without au...

Abuse during childhood can cause structural changes in the brain that increase a person's risk of severe and recurrent depression, a new study reveals.

The findings "add further weight to the notion that patients with clinical depression who were mistreated as children are clinically distinct" from people who didn't suffer such trauma in early life, said study leader Nils Opel. He's a...

Adults have spent a lifetime hearing about or experiencing natural disasters such as Hurricane Florence, which is targeting the Carolinas this week.

But how to explain to kids the dangers of these events, without unduly scaring them?

The key, said child psychiatrist Dr. Victor Fornari, is to lead by example.

"Parents need to remain calm and model reassurance," said...

It's easy to roll your eyes at the latest news nugget about someone trying to take an "emotional support animal" onto a plane, even though it's too big or out of control.

There's the large emotional support peacock that was denied a seat aboard a United Airlines flight in January, for example. Or the young girl who was bitten by an emotional support dog while boarding a Southwest Airl...

Anger isn't just an emotional reaction -- it can affect you physically, too.

It's been shown to raise your risk for heart disease and other problems related to stress -- like sleep trouble, digestion woes and headaches.

That makes it important, then, to diffuse your anger. Start by figuring out what it is that makes you angry.

Researchers from George Mason Univers...

Juggling classes, jobs and extracurricular activities can lead to big-time burnout in college, but knowing its signs can help savvy students avoid it, one psychologist says.

"Burnout is described as feeling apathy and lack of interest toward activities that were previously enjoyable, some amount of work avoidance and less excitement over one's day-to-day tasks," said clinical psycholo...

The advice to "let go" of negative feelings is repeated in yoga classes and self-help books. Now a new study suggests it really brings a lasting health benefit.

The study, of more than 1,100 middle-aged adults, found that those who had a hard time getting over daily stressors typically had more physical health problems a decade later.

And it wasn't just that people who were ...

Highly expressive eyebrows likely played a big role in humans' evolutionary success, researchers report.

Early ancestors of humans had a large, bulging brow ridge -- a permanent signal of dominance and aggression, according to the team at the University of York in England.

But over the past 100,000 years, modern humans developed a smooth forehead with more visible, hairy eye...

Could new forms of artificial intelligence someday guess what you're feeling just by looking at you?

It's a good bet, according to Ohio State University researchers who study human expressions of emotions.

They say subtle changes in facial color telegraph your feelings to other people -- and they created computer algorithms that can detect the same changes.

Even wi...

Neurons in a brain area involved with social and emotional behavior normally increase as children become adults, but this does not occur in people with autism, new research contends.

Instead, children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have too many neurons in this part of the brain -- the amygdala -- and lose neurons as they mature, according to researchers at the MIND Institute at ...

Many of us make choices about whether to eat healthy or not-so-healthy foods based on whether we're in a good or not-so-good mood.

When a bad mood strikes, we often tend to reach for junk food. And that can be a recipe for disaster when you're trying to lose weight.

Here's how to keep your emotions from ruining your diet resolve.

First, it helps to think about the ...

Can the adoring gaze of a dog or the comforting purr of a cat be helpful to people with mental illness? Absolutely, new research suggests.

Although furry companions won't replace medications or therapy for mental health concerns, they can provide significant benefits, according to British researchers. Their review of 17 studies found that pets can provide comfort, alleviate worry, lo...