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Health News Results - 184

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients in the United States spend more time in the hospital and are more likely to require intensive care than patients in China, a new study says.

The findings suggest that the coronavirus pandemic may be putting greater strain on U.S. hospitals than previously assumed, according to researchers.

"The hospital resources needed to meet the needs of sev...

U.S. emergency rooms are seeing about half as many heart attack patients as usual -- and researchers suspect the new coronavirus is the reason why.

It's not that fewer people are having heart attacks, doctors say. Rather, it's fear of getting COVID-19 keeping people from hospitals.

And the consequences can be deadly.

"I'm certainly not convinced that the true rat...

More than one-fifth of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in New York City have critical illness, and nearly 80% of critically ill patients need ventilators to help them breathe, according to a new study.

The findings have important implications for U.S. hospitals, specifically the need to prepare for large numbers of COVID-19 patients who require intensive care, the researchers said....

During the current coronavirus pandemic, U.S. hospitals are seeing fewer people for signs of stroke, a new study finds.

Evaluations for stroke have dropped nearly 40%, said researchers who looked at data from more than 850 hospitals across the country.

"Our stroke team has maintained full capacity to provide emergency stroke treatment at all times, even during the heig...

Some elective surgeries that were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic have since been rescheduled. But is it safe to have that knee replacement or cataract removal now?

The American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) offers a checklist to help you make that determination.

"Physicians, hospitals and health systems are eager to resume elective surgeries, and patients are...

The new coronavirus is disproportionately striking minority populations -- particularly urban blacks and Navajo Indians living on their reservation. Experts say social and economic factors that predate the COVID-19 crisis may help explain why.

"We found that there were large disparities in the proportion of people at risk of COVID-19 from minority and low-income populations," said stu...

A new analysis suggests there may be a simple, noninvasive technique that could delay, or even eliminate, the need for ventilation in COVID-19 patients.

It's called "proning." And it appears to be remarkably effective at boosting "blood oxygen saturation" levels, often called sats, among COVID patients struggling with abnormally low levels (known as hypoxia).

"Proning is bas...

The COVID-19 pandemic has done untold economic damage in the United States, with businesses shuttering and people self-isolating at home to try to slow the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus.

You might think hospitals and health care systems would be immune to this wave of financial ruin, since there's no industry more crucial to America's fight against the pandemic.

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Loss of smell is more likely to occur in patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 than in those with more severe illness, a new study finds.

This information could give health care providers an early indication of which patients may require hospitalization, according to the University of California, San Diego Health researchers.

"One of the immediate challenges for health car...

Seniors hospitalized with pneumonia are much more likely to die in the hospital and within two years of leaving the hospital than those with hip fractures, new research shows.

But many older people don't recognize the serious threat posed by pneumonia, the researchers said. The study took place in 2009 to 2015, years before the coronavirus pandemic and its respiratory effects became a...

While children seem to have been largely spared from the worst of the coronavirus pandemic, a new study suggests it's possible that up to 50,000 U.S. children might end up hospitalized with COVID-19 by the end of 2020.

And, if around 25% of the U.S. population has been infected with COVID-19 by the end of this year, it's likely that more than 5,000 children and teens would be crit...

No one wants to be in the hospital during the coronavirus pandemic, but people who need emergency surgery may have no choice.

If that's the case for you or a loved one, ask about using regional anesthesia. That's the advice of experts from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine (ASRA) and the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy.

T...

As U.S. hospitals deal with a continuing influx of COVID-19 patients, cardiologists are sounding an alarm: People may be ignoring heart attack symptoms in fear of going to the ER.

Since the coronavirus first hit the United States, doctors at a number of hospitals have noticed a pattern. Fewer patients are being treated for heart attacks at a time when -- if anything -- an increase wou...

Many health care workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic are struggling with sleep, a new study finds.

The researchers also found that those with insomnia were more likely to have depression, anxiety and stress-based trauma.

The study included nearly 1,600 health care workers who completed an online questionnaire between January 29 and February 3 at the peak o...

If you or someone you love has diabetes, you've probably noticed that diabetes always pops up on lists of people at higher risk from COVID-19 infections. And you've probably wondered why.

The good news is that people with diabetes -- any type -- don't seem to have a greater risk of catching the virus. The bad news is if you do get it and you have diabetes, you have higher odds of hav...

With a sudden need for more ventilators due to the coronavirus pandemic, researchers have been busy trying to come up with alternatives to a standard ventilator.

Engineers from Georgia Tech and Emory University in Atlanta think they may have developed such a device. They've created a simple, low-cost ventilator that builds on the widely used resuscitation bags found in ambulances and...

As you shelter at home during the coronavirus pandemic, eliminate hazards inside that could lead to falls, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) suggests.

Preventing injuries will help avoid putting added strain on a health care system struggling to treat COVID-19 patients, academy spokesman Dr. Todd Swenning said.

One out of five falls causes a serious injury,...

As COVID-19 pushes American hospitals to the breaking point, intensive care units are finding creative ways to deal with a looming shortage of lifesaving mechanical ventilators.

New York-Presbyterian Hospital last week began splitting single-use ventilators into machines that can serve two patients at a time. Now another New York-based hospital system, Northwell Health, has stepped up...

Once infected with the new coronavirus, a 20-something has about a 1% chance of illness so severe it requires hospitalization, and that risk rises to more than 8% for people in their 50s and to nearly 19% for people over 80, a comprehensive new analysis finds.

On the other hand, the death rate from COVID-19 is significantly lower than that seen in prior estimates, the new ...

Amid a shortage of face masks for medical personnel fighting COVID-19, two studies show that disposable N95 masks can be sterilized and re-used.

A nationwide mask shortage has put health care workers and patients at risk, but the new findings may offer ways to ease that shortage.

Researchers at University of Massachusetts (UMass) Amherst report that an N95 mask steril...

Faced with a looming shortage of lifesaving ventilators, U.S. hospitals are scrambling for solutions and planning for the worst.

Intensive care units at besieged hospitals in New York and other cities are taking an "all hands on deck" approach -- recruiting doctors from various specialties to help handle the influx of severely ill COVID-19 patients.

They are also finding way...

Nearly half of U.S. health care facilities are already or nearly out of respirators worn by staff to protect against infection as they care for COVID-19 patients, a new survey shows.

One in five facilities have no respirators and 28% are almost out of the filtering face masks, which provide advanced protection against viral infection, the online survey of 1,140 infection preventio...

For people very sick with COVID-19, access to a mechanical ventilator can mean life or death. Trouble is, they're in short supply in the United Sates and around the world.

Now, research suggests that a widely used clot-busting stroke drug might help COVID-19 patients who can't access a ventilator or who fail to improve even when they do gain access.

The research focuses on ...

Many hospitals across the United States regularly operate with most of their beds taken by patients, limiting their ability to handle a sudden influx of folks sick with COVID-19, a new study reports.

Only about 1 of every 3 U.S. hospital beds is empty on any given day, according to research from the Urban Institute, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

"All indicati...

Considering a knee replacement? Plastic surgery?

With a pandemic of new coronavirus cases looming, it's probably time to postpone elective surgery if you can, a surgeons' group says.

In a statement, the American College of Surgeons (ACS) noted that as cases of severe COVID-19 requiring hospitalization rise, U.S. health care infrastructure and resources could be pushed to the...

The day paramedics rushed Jeramiah Parsons to the hospital, his lips were so sore and swollen he had trouble talking. A skin-picking habit related to his methamphetamine addiction had permitted a dangerous antibiotic-resistant infection to take up residence in his face. He had no health insurance and no doctor he could call.

"It's difficult to acquire a primary care physician, especia...

If you wind up in the hospital with coronavirus, what might raise your chances of dying from the disease?

A new study offers some answers: being older; showing signs of sepsis; and having blood-clotting issues. To come to that conclusion, researchers analyzed 191 adult patients with confirmed COVID-19 at two hospitals in Wuhan, China, the city where the worldwide outbreak began.

...

Wash your hands. Don't touch your face. Don't grab that door handle. Put the toilet seat lid down before you flush.

COVID-19 has prompted a mountain of advice about how to protect yourself against coronavirus infection, and now a trio of studies of infected patients offer very encouraging news on what works.

The bad news first -- people infected with the new coronavirus appe...

Too few Americans have quick access to a medical center that can perform a procedure to remove stroke-causing blood clots, new research shows.

For the study, researchers examined nationwide availability of endovascular thrombectomy -- removal of a blood clot with a mechanical device that's threaded through an artery.

It improves patients' outcomes if it's performed within 24...

If your doctors keep giving you prescriptions for antibiotics, you might be at increased risk of hospitalization for a serious infection, a new report suggests.

For the study, researchers analyzed data from 2 million patients in England and Wales. These patients had received prescriptions for antibiotics between 2000 and 2016 to treat common infections such as upper respiratory tract,...

In a finding that likely applies to emergency rooms across the United States, researchers report that over 10,000 uninsured patients needed lifesaving kidney dialysis at Texas emergency departments in 2017.

Those patients incurred almost $22 million in hospital costs, the University of Texas Health Science Center scientists said.

The kidneys remove waste and fluid from the b...

As the new coronavirus spreads across the United States, leading health experts are noting that America has been here before -- and past lessons are helping officials prepare for today's crisis.

Starting with the 2003 SARS epidemic and the avian influenza ("bird flu") outbreak of 2005, many U.S. hospitals, nursing homes and other health facilities started putting disease outbreak prep...

Helping older people manage their prescribed medicines after they leave the hospital reduces their risk of readmission, researchers say.

Many older patients take multiple medicines and these often change after a hospital stay. This can cause misunderstandings that result in patients taking too much or too little of their medications, or not taking them at all, the authors of the new s...

Older Americans often return home from the hospital with disabilities they didn't have before, a new study finds.

These new problems can lead to difficulties with daily activities, such as bathing and dressing, shopping and preparing meals, and getting around inside and outside the home.

Such struggles can lead to re-hospitalization, having to go to a nursing home and perman...

Rave online reviews about a hospital stay may not mean much about the actual medical care there, if a new study is any indication.

Researchers found that across U.S. hospitals, patient-satisfaction scores were more dependent on "hospitality" factors -- like friendly nurses, quiet rooms and good food -- than on hard measures of health care quality.

Too many patients who go to U.S. emergency rooms for dental problems are prescribed antibiotics and opioid painkillers, a new study claims.

The findings show the need for continued efforts to combat both opioid abuse and overuse of antibiotics, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention researchers said.

For the study, the investigators analyzed 2012 to 2014 data an...

Americans don't seem to care about the race or sex of emergency room doctors, a new study shows.

Participants were asked to rate their satisfaction with a simulated ER visit and the scores were the same whether their doctor was white or black, or a man or a woman.

"We were really surprised that even after looking at these data in many different ways, we did not see evidence...

Hospitals are bracing for the potential spread of coronavirus in the United States, trying to plan for a potential onslaught of sick patients combined with potential supply shortages.

The strict quarantine and screening measures enacted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have given hospitals breathing space to review their pandemic plans and stockpile needed equip...

One-quarter of kids who receive antibiotics in U.S. children's hospitals are given the drugs inappropriately, which increases the risk of antibiotic resistance, researchers say.

"Antibiotic resistance is a growing danger to everyone; however, there is limited data on children," said study co-author Dr. Jason Newland, a professor of pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis.

...

Teen and young adult cancer survivors are nearly twice as likely to be hospitalized as those who haven't had cancer, a new study finds.

"Few studies have investigated health risk in adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment," said study author Chelsea Anderson, a postdoctoral fellow at the American Cancer Society.

She and her colleagues from the University of Utah ...

Many hospitals use bedside "sitters" to protect patients from falling, but a new review finds little evidence the tactic works.

However, researchers said the problem is a lack of rigorous studies -- and not proof that bedside sitters are ineffective. So it would be premature to abandon the practice.

"We've been doing this for years," said Dr. Cathy Schubert, a geriatrics spe...

Deaths at intensive care units (ICUs) have steadily declined in the last decade, but the same cannot be said for ICUs with large numbers of minority patients.

In a new study, researchers analyzed over 1 million patients at more than 200 U.S. hospitals from 2006 to 2016. Not only was there less improvement in mortality rates in hospitals with large numbers of minority patients, but the...

Men and women are flooding America's emergency rooms because of suicidal thoughts and injuries caused by harming themselves, federal health officials reported Thursday.

In fact, these types of emergency room visits shot up 25.5% from 2017 to 2018, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

April Foreman, an executive committee member of the board ...

This flu season is hitting children particularly hard, but new research shows that a flu shot is still well worth it for these youngest patients.

Getting vaccinated halved the risk of hospitalization for flu-related complications among young kids, scientists found.

The researchers analyzed vaccination data from more than 3,700 children, ages 6 months to 8 years, who were adm...

Could a simple computer hack help make a dent in the opioid epidemic?

New research suggests that the number of painkillers prescribed to patients can be reduced just by lowering default computer settings that display a preset number of pills.

That simple change led doctors at two California hospitals to prescribe fewer opioids, and the approach could improve opioid prescribi...

Sepsis kills more than twice as many people worldwide as once believed, and children in poor regions account for an excessive number of such deaths, researchers say.

Sepsis is an out-of-control immune response to infection that harms organs. People who survive sepsis can have lifelong disabilities.

In 2017, there were 48.9 million cases of sepsis and 11 million sepsis deaths...

Providing palliative care in hospitals led to a 10% reduction in intensive care unit use by dying patients, a new study finds.

Palliative care aims to provide relief from symptoms and stress of a serious illness.

Researchers say that ICU use at the end of life is considered an indicator of poor quality of care. The study's findings suggest that "implementing palliative ca...

This year's flu season has already turned bad quickly, and experts worry the worst is still to come.

Flu cases and flu-related hospitalizations have risen sharply since October, with at least 6.4 million reported cases and 55,000 hospitalizations, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At least 2,900 Americans have died from the flu, the CDC report...

Electric scooter accidents are sending droves to emergency rooms -- especially young adults, a new study finds.

As e-scooters' popularity has exploded, so have injuries -- skyrocketing 222% between 2014 and 2018 to more than 39,000. Hospital admissions also soared -- 365% to nearly 3,300.

Head injuries made up about a third of the injuries -- twice the rate seen in...

One in 10 hospital patients who develop Clostridioides difficile infections may already have the dangerous germ when admitted, but no diarrhea symptoms, a new study finds.

The new report suggests that such infections originate outside hospitals more often than believed, and that patients could be screened to prevent the spread of C. difficile, according to the authors.